ethiopia

Undated Save the Children handout photo of children attending classes at Save the Children's Early Childhood Care and Development pre-school and Child Friendly Space, Centre at a refugee camp, in Ethiopia. Chronically malnourished children struggle to read and write simple sentences regardless of their level of schooling, according to research by Save the Children. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Tuesday May 28, 2013. A report by the charity, Food for Thought, shows that eight year olds who are stunted by malnutrition are 19% more likely to make a mistake reading simple sentence like, "The sun is hot". Stunted children are 12.5% more likely to make a mistake writing a simple sentenc

Save the Children/PA

Children attend classes at Save the Children’s Early Childhood Care and Development pre-school at a refugee camp in Ethiopia. Chronically malnourished children struggle to read and write simple sentences, whatever their level of schooling, according to research by the charity. The report Food for Thought shows that eight-year-olds who are stunted by malnutrition are 19% more likely to make a mistake reading simple sentences.

A man walks on sulphur and mineral salt formations near Dallol in the Danakil Depression...A man walks on sulphur and mineral salt formations near Dallol in the Danakil Depression, northern Ethiopia April 22, 2013. The Danakil Depression in Ethiopia is one of the hottest and harshest environments on earth, with an average annual temperature of 94 degrees Fahrenheit (34.4 Celsius). For centuries, merchants have travelled there with caravans of camels to collect salt from the surface of the vast desert basin. The mineral is extracted and shaped into slabs, then loaded onto the animals before being transported back across the desert so that it can be sold around the country. Picture taken April 22, 2013. REUTERS/Siegfried Modola (ETHIOPIA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)     ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 2 OF 30 FOR PACKAGE 'ETHIOPIA'S ANCIENT SALT TRAIL'  SEARCH 'DANAKIL DEPRESSION' FOR ALL

Reuters

The Danakil Depression in Ethiopia is one of the hottest and harshest environments on earth, with an average annual temperature of 94 degrees Fahrenheit (34.4 Celsius). For centuries, merchants have traveled there with caravans of camels to collect salt from the surface of the vast desert basin. The mineral is extracted and shaped into slabs, then loaded onto the animals before being transported back across the desert so that it can be sold around the country. 

An Orthodox Christian walks between the famous monolithic rock-cut churches during a Good Friday celebration in Lalibela May 3, 2013.

Goran Tomasevic/Reuters

An Orthodox Christian walks between the famous monolithic rock-cut churches during a Good Friday celebration in Lalibela, Ethiopia.