hindu

A man brushes his teeth as another reads a newspaper while a Hindu holy man sips tea in the morning in front of a closed shop in Allahabad, India, Wednesday, July 30, 2014. (AP Photo/ Rajesh Kumar Singh)

Rajesh Kumar Singh/AP

A man brushes his teeth as another reads a newspaper while a Hindu holy man sips tea in the morning in front of a closed shop in Allahabad, IndiaRead more

A Sadhu or a Hindu holy man offers milk to the waters of holy river Ganga as part of his morning prayers in the northern Indian city of Allahabad June 26, 2014.

Jitendra Prakash/Reuters

A Sadhu Hindu holy man offers milk at the waters of the holy river Ganga as part of his morning prayers in the northern Indian city of Allahabad

India Hinduism

Rajesh Kumar Singh/AP

A girl, left, sells flowers as Hindu devotees arrive for a ritualistic holy dip at Sangam, the confluence of rivers the Ganges and the Yamuna in Allahabad, India, on Tuesday

Balinese Hindus celebrate Galungan Day...GIANYAR, BALI, INDONESIA - MAY 21:  A Balinese Hindus man pours holy water for belivers during they celebrate Galungan Day at a temple on May 21, 2014 in Gianyar, Bali, Indonesia. Galungan is an important feast for Balinese Hindus which is held every 210 days according to the Balinese calendar, to honor the creator of the universe and the spirits of the honored ancestors. The festival symbolize the victory of "dharma", or truth, above "adharma", or evil.  (Photo by Agung Parameswara/Getty Images)

Agung Parameswara/Getty

A Balinese Hindu man pours holy water during Galungan Day celebrations at a temple in Gianyar, Bali, Indonesia. Galungan is an important feast for Balinese Hindus and is held every 210 days according to the Balinese calendar to honour the creator of the universe and the spirits of the ancestors. The festival symbolises the victory of truth over evil Read more

Residents and visitors to a ghat swim an...Residents and visitors to a ghat swim and sit by the banks of the Ganges river after sunrise in Varanasi in May 18, 2014. The Ganges river is considered sacred in the Hindu religion and is revered as a goddess.  AFP PHOTO/ROBERTO SCHMIDTROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images

Roberto Schmidt/AFP

Residents and visitors swim and sit by the banks of the Ganges river after sunrise in Varanasi, India. The Ganges river is considered sacred in the Hindu religion and is revered as a goddess Read more

Hindu girls dressed up as Kumari wait for rituals to start during Ramnavmi festival on outskirts of Kolkata

Reuters

Hindu girls dressed up as Kumari (an unmarried girl) wait for rituals to start during Ramnavmi festival at the Adyapeath Ashram on the outskirts of Kolkata on Tuesday

A Hindu holy man waves to attract tourists as he stands seeking alms at the Pashupatinath Hindu temple premises in Katmandu, Nepal, Monday, March 24, 2014. The Pashupatinath temple on the banks of the Bagmati River is one of the most revered temples of Lord Shiva, the Hindu god of death and destruction. (AP Photo/Niranjan Shrestha)

Niranjan Shresth/AP

A Hindu holy man waves to attract tourists as he stands seeking alms at the Pashupatinath Hindu temple premises in Katmandu, Nepal. The Pashupatinath temple on the banks of the Bagmati River is one of the most revered temples of Lord Shiva, the Hindu god of death and destruction.

An Indian Hindu devotee performs with fi...An Indian Hindu devotee performs with fire as he participates in a procession ahead of the Holi festival in Amritsar on March 12, 2014. Holi, the popular Hindu spring festival of colours is observed in India at the end of the winter season on the last full moon of the lunar month and will be celebrated on March 16 this year. AFP PHOTO/NARINDER NANUNARINDER NANU/AFP/Getty Images

Narinder Nanu/AFP

An Indian Hindu devotee participates in a procession ahead of the Holi festival in Amritsar. Holi, the popular Hindu spring festival of colours, is observed in India at the end of the winter season on the last full moon of the lunar month and will be celebrated on March 16 this year. Read more

Indian women from Nandgaon village hold wooden sticks as they wait for the arrival of men from Barsana, during Lathmar Holi festival at Nandgaon 120 kilometers (75 miles) south of New Delhi, India, Monday, March 10, 2014. According to a tradition which has its roots in Hindu mythology, men from nearby Barsana village are soaked in colored water by men and beaten with sticks by women as they arrive at Nandgaon, believed to be Lord Krishna's village. (AP Photo/Altaf Qadri)

Altaf Qadri/AP

Women from Nandgaon village hold wooden sticks as they wait for the arrival of men from Barsana, during the Lathmar Holi festival at Nandgaon, 120 km south of New Delhi, India. According to a tradition that has its roots in Hindu mythology, men from Barsana are soaked in coloured water by men and beaten with sticks by women as they arrive at Nandgaon, believed to be Lord Krishna’s village Read more

In this photograph taken on March 5, 201...In this photograph taken on March 5, 2014, sixty-five year old Indian widow Urmila Tiwari poses at the Meerasahabhagini Ashram in Vrindavan, some 135 kilometres (80 miles) south of New Delhi, ahead of International Women's Day. Tiwari has lived at the ashram for over a year and says, I love to live here, among good people. Banished by families who see them as a financial drain, or believe they bring bad fortune, desperately poor widows have for centuries travelled to the northern city of Vrindavan, where the Hindu god Krishna is said to have grown up, to pray and wait to die. Traditionally, Vrindavans widows sung hymns and begged in the pilgrimage city on the banks of the Yamuna River, living in seclusion and shame and expected to dress in white, signifying the loss of colour from their lives. The Meerasahabhagini Ashram run by the Sulabh International NGO offers a place where some of Vrindavans estimated 15,000 widows can live together, providing support and friendship that bind them into a community. International Women's Day falls on March 8.

Rebecca Conway/AFP

Sixty-five-year old Indian widow Urmila Tiwari poses at the Meerasahabhagini Ashram in Vrindavan, some 135 kilometres south of New Delhi, ahead of International Women’s Day. Ms Tiwari has lived at the ashram for over a year and says, “I love to live here, among good people”. Banished by families who see them as a financial drain, or believe they bring bad fortune, desperately poor widows have for centuries travelled to the northern city of Vrindavan, where the Hindu god Krishna is said to have grown up, to pray and wait to die. The Meerasahabhagini Ashram run by the Sulabh International NGO offers a place where some of Vrindavans estimated 15,000 widows can live together, providing support and friendship that bind them into a community. International Women’s Day falls on Saturday Read more