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A technician stands near equipment of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experience at the Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in the French village of Cessy near Geneva in Switzerland April 15, 2013.  As hundreds of engineers and workers start two years of work to fit out the giant LHC particle collider to reach deep into unknown realms of nature, CERN physicists look to the vast machine to unveil by the end of the decade the nature of the mysterious dark matter that makes up a quarter of the universe and perhaps find new dimensions of space.

Denis Balibouse/Reuters

A technician stands near the equipment of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment at the Organization for Nuclear Research (Cern) in the French village of Cessy near Geneva in Switzerland on April 15 2013. As hundreds of engineers and workers start two years of work to fit out the giant LHC particle collider to reach deep into unknown realms of nature, Cern physicists look to the vast machine to unveil by the end of the decade the nature of the mysterious dark matter that makes up a quarter of the universe and perhaps find new dimensions of space.