luxor

An Egyptian policeman stands guard in the Valley of Kings in Luxor, Egypt on Thursday. Despite ongoing security concerns in the north African country, tourists are still visiting Egypt's main attractions such as Luxor and the Red Sea

Oliver Weiken/EPA

An Egyptian policeman stands guard in the Valley of the Kings in Luxor, Egypt on Thursday. Despite ongoing security concerns in the north African country, tourists are still visiting Egypt’s main attractions such as Luxor and the Red Sea

Tourists visit Karnak temple in Luxor, a town 700 kilometres (435 miles) south of the Egyptian capital, Cairo, on June 11, 2015. The ancient temple was open as usual despite a foiled suicide and gun attack on the world-famous site that police said would have been a "massacre".

Mohamed El-Shahed/AFP

Tourists visit Karnak temple in Luxor, a town 700 kilometres (435 miles) south of the Egyptian capital, Cairo, on Thursday. The ancient temple was open as usual despite a foiled suicide and gun attack on the world-famous site

A protester carries stones in one hand and a beer bottle in the other as he kneels in front of burning tyres set by protesters in front of Luxor governorate building to protest against the newly-appointed governor, Adel Mohamed al-Khayat, who was a member of the militant group, al-Gamaa al-Islamiya, in Luxor, June 19, 2013. Al-Khayat was a member of the militant group blamed for slaughtering 58 tourists in Egypt's Valley of the Queens; today he's promising to keep visitors safe. Khayat's appointment by President Mohamed Mursi as governor of the city of Luxor has triggered howls of protest, with demonstrators protesting for a third day on Wednesday and one critic calling it "the last nail in the coffin of tourism".

Reuters

A protester kneels in front of burning tyres in front of Luxor governorate building to protest against the newly-appointed governor, Adel Mohamed al-Khayat.