Myanmar

US President Obama visit to Myanmar...epaselect epa04488931 US President Barack Obama (L) and Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi (R) greet each other at the Suu Kyi's resident in Yangon, Myanmar, 14 November 2014. US President Barack Obama is visiting Myanmar from 12 to 14 November 2014 as part of his six-days visit including China and Australia from November 10-16. During his second time visit to Myanmar, Obama attended the East Asia Summit (EAS), the US-ASEAN Summit and held a bilateral meeting with President Thein Sein in Naypyitaw.  EPA/NYEIN CHAN NAING

Nyein Chan Naing/EPA

US President Barack Obama and Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi greet each other at her house in Yangon, Myanmar

A policeman secures a university compound where U.S. President Barack Obama will meet members of different youth organisations, in Yangon...A policeman secures a university compound where U.S. President Barack Obama will meet members of different youth organisations, in Yangon November 14, 2014. Obama, visiting Myanmar's opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi on Friday, said a provision in the Southeast Asian nation's constitution that prevents candidates from running for president because of their children's nationality made no sense. REUTERS/Damir Sagolj (MYANMAR - Tags: POLITICS)

Damir Sagolj/Reuters

A policeman secures a university compound where U.S. President Barack Obama will meet members of different youth organisations, in Yangon. Obama, visiting Myanmar‘s opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi on Friday, said a provision in the Southeast Asian nation’s constitution that prevents candidates from running for president because of their children’s nationality made no sense. 

A Myanmar Shiite Muslim child looks up w...A Myanmar Shiite Muslim child looks up while outside a mosque during a procession to mark the Ashura festival in Yangon on November 4, 2014. Ashura marks the peak of 10 days of mourning for the death of Imam Hussein, one of the most revered figures in Shiite Islam.     AFP PHOTO / Ye Aung THUYe Aung Thu/AFP/Getty Images

Ye Aung Thu/AFP/Getty

A Myanmar Shia Muslim child stands outside a mosque during a procession for the Ashura festival in Yangon. Ashura marks the peak of 10 days of mourning for the death of Imam Hussein, one of the most revered figures in Shiite Islam 

Myanmar Bell Salvage

Gemunu Amarasinghe/AP Photo

A boy peddles a boat with passengers that came to see the recovery efforts of an ancient bell in a river in Yangon, Myanmar, on Friday. Divers attached to safety ropes plunged into waters south of Myanmar’s old capital as part of renewed efforts to retrieve a 270-tonne bronze bell, believed to be one of the largest ever cast, that has been lying for centuries at the confluence of three rivers.

Local residents ride a boat on a flooded road overflown by the Bago river at a low-lying part in Bago, 80 kilometers (50 miles) northeast of Yangon, Myanmar, Monday, Aug. 4, 2014.   Flooding is common during Myanmar's monsoon season, which typically starts in late May and ends in mid-October.

Khin Maung Win/AP

Local residents ride a boat on a flooded road overflown by the Bago river at a low-lying part in Bago, 80 kilometers (50 miles) northeast of Yangon, Myanmar

The faithful wear traditional costumes a...The faithful wear traditional costumes as they take part in a ceremony at Shwedagon pagoda on the full moon day of Kasone Festival to mark Buddha's birthday in Yangon on May 13, 2014.  The festival commemorates the anniversary of the birth, enlightenment and death of the historical Shakyamuni Gautam Buddha. AFP PHOTO/YE AUNG THUYe Aung Thu/AFP/Getty Images

Ye Aung Thu/AFP

The faithful wear traditional costumes as they take part in a ceremony at Shwedagon pagoda on the full moon day of Kasone festival to mark Buddha’s birthday in Yangon, Myanmar. The festival commemorates the anniversary of the birth, enlightenment and death of the historical Shakyamuni 

Rohingya Refugees Face Health Crisis As Myanmar Cuts Off Aid...SITTWE, BURMA - MAY 06: Rosheda, 20, holds her malnourished child, 2 months old, in front of her hut. She is too poor to afford enough food and the child will likely die without aid on May 6, 2014 in Sittwe, Burma. Some 150,000 Rohingya IDP (internally displaced people) are currently imprisoned in refugee camps outside of Sittwe in Rakhine State in Western Myanmar. Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF), the primary supplier of medical care within the camps, was banned in March by the Myanmar government. Follow up attacks by Buddhist mobs on the homes of aid workers in Sittwe put an end to NGO operations in the camps. Though some NGOs are beginning to resume work, MSF remains banned, and little to no healthcare is being provided to most Rohingya IDPs. One Rohingya doctor is servicing 150,000 refugees with limited medication. Several Rakhine volunteer doctors sporadically enter the camps for two hours a day. Births are the most complicated procedures successfully carried out in the camps, requests to visit Yangon or Sittwe hospitals for life threatening situations require lengthy applications and are routinely denied. Malnutrition and diarrhea are the most widespread issues, but more serious diseases like tuberculosis are going untreated and could lead to the rise of drug resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB).  (Photo by Andre Malerba/Getty Images)

Andre Malerba/Getty

Rosheda holds her two-month-old child in front of her hut. She is too poor to afford enough food, and the child will likely die without aid in Sittwe, Myanmar. Some 150,000 Rohingya internally displaced people are trapped in refugee camps outside of Sittwe in Rakhine State in western Myanmar.

A displaced Rohingya woman carries her severely malnourished twins in her lap in their house at the Dar Paing camp for internally displaced people in Sittwe, Rakhine state...Displaced Rohingya woman Norbagoun carries her severely malnourished 25-day-old twins in her lap in their house at the Dar Paing camp for internally displaced people in Sittwe, Rakhine state, April 24, 2014. Restrictions on international aid have exacerbated a growing health crisis among stateless Muslim Rohingya in west Myanmar. In February, Myanmar's government expelled the main aid group providing health to more than half a million Rohingya, Medecins Sans Frontieres-Holland (MSF-H), after the organisation said it had treated people believed to have been victims of violence in southern Maungdaw township in January. The United Nations says at least 40 Rohingya were killed there by Buddhist Rakhine villagers. The government denies any killings occurred. An attack in March on NGO and U.N. offices by a Rakhine mob led to the withdrawal of other groups providing healthcare and other essential aid to another 140,000 Rohingya living in camps. Picture taken April 24, 2014. REUTERS/Minzayar (MYANMAR - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY HEALTH)    ATTENTION EDITORS: PICTURE 07 OF 24 FOR PACKAGE "ROHINGYA HEALTH CRISIS IN WEST MYANMAR".

Minzayar/Reuters

Displaced Rohingya woman Norbagoun carries her severely malnourished 25-day-old twins on her lap at the Dar Paing camp for internally displaced people in Sittwe, Rakhine state. Restrictions on international aid have exacerbated a growing health crisis among stateless Muslim Rohingya in west Myanmar

A boy looks from his temporary shelter at a Rohingya refugee camp as Myanmar's government embarks on a national census, in Sittwe April 2, 2014. At least 20,000 people in displacement camps around Sittwe will run out of drinking water within 10 days, while food stocks will run out within two weeks, imperilling thousands more. In the absence of nongovernment organisations (NGOs), the United Nations is working with the government to bring emergency supplies to camps, but that is only a short-term solution, said Pierre Peron, a spokesman for the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. The evacuation of aid workers came as Myanmar prepared to launch its first census since 1983, which sparked controversy because it included questions on religion and ethnicity. Those are sensitive subjects in a country riven by sectarian tensions and especially in Rakhine, which is home to a million mostly stateless Rohingya whom the government refers to as Bengali, implying they are illegal immigrants from Bangladesh

Soe Zeya Tun/Reuters

A boy at in a temporary shelter at a Rohingya refugee camp in Myanmar, where the government is conducting a national census. At least 20,000 people in displacement camps around Sittwe will run out of drinking water within 10 days, while food stocks will run out within two weeks, imperilling thousands more. The UN is working with the government to bring emergency supplies to camps, but that is only a short-term solution, said Pierre Peron, a spokesman for the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs

Internally displaced Muslims children

Soe Than WIN/AFP/Getty Images

Muslim children rest inside their tent during a census at an internally displaced people’s refugee camp at Theechaung village on the outskirts of Sittwe, in the western Myanmar state of Rakhine on Tuesday