NASA

A total lunar eclipse takes place in the...A total lunar eclipse takes place in the sky over the Mexican city of Guadalajara early on April 15, 2014. The entire event was to be visible from North and South America, but sky watchers in northern and and eastern Europe, eastern Africa, the Middle East and Central Asia were out of luck, according to US space agency NASA.     AFP PHOTO / Hector GuerreroHECTOR GUERRERO/AFP/Getty Images

Hector Guerrero/AFP

A total lunar eclipse takes place in the sky over the Mexican city of Guadalajara early on Tuesday. The event was to be visible from North and South America, but sky watchers in northern and eastern Europe, eastern Africa, the Middle East and Central Asia were not as lucky, according to US space agency Nasa. Read more

This image provided by NASA March 16, 2014 shows a portion of the Florida Keys taken by Astronaut Rick Mastracchio from the International Space Station. (AP Photo/NASA, Rich Mastracchio)

Rich Mastracchio/Nasa/AP

This image provided by NASA shows a portion of the Florida Keys taken by Astronaut Rick Mastracchio from the International Space Station Read more

Landing of the Soyuz TMA-10M Spacecraft...ZHEZKAZGAN, KAZAHSTAN - MARCH 11: In this handout provided by NASA, Expedition 38 Flight Engineer Sergey Ryazanskiy of the Russian Federal Space Agency, Roscosmos, is helped out of the Soyuz Capsule just minutes after he and Commander Oleg Kotov of the Roscosmos, and, Flight Engineer Mike Hopkins of NASA (not pictured) landed in their Soyuz TMA-10M spacecraft on March 11 near the town of Zhezkazgan, Kazakhstan. Hopkins, Kotov and Ryazanskiy returned to Earth after five and a half months onboard the International Space Station where they served as members of the Expedition 37 and 38 crews.

Bill Ingalls/NASA/Getty

Flight engineer Sergey Ryazanskiy of the Russian Federal Space Agency, Roscosmos, is helped out of the Soyuz Capsule just minutes after he and Commander Oleg Kotov of the Roscosmos landed on Tuesday near the town of Zhezkazgan, Kazakhstan. They returned to Earth after five and a half months on board the International Space Station. Read more

Martian dune valley...epa04054024 A handout picture made available by NASA on 04 February 2014 show a view combining several frames taken by the Mast Camera (Mastcam) on NASA's Mars rover Curiosity, looking into a dune valley on Mars, 30 January 2014. The team operating Curiosity has chosen this valley as a likely route toward mid-term and long-term science destinations. The foreground dune, at a location called 'Dingo Gap', is about one meter high in the middle and tapered at south and north ends onto low scarps on either side of the gap. The center of the view is about ten degree south of straight west. The left edge is about 20 degree west of straight south. The right edge is northwest. The largest of the dark rocks on the sand in the right half of the scene are about 60 cm across. The image has been white-balanced to show what the rocks would look like if they were on Earth. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, USA, manages the Mars Science Laboratory Project for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) designed and built the project's Curiosity rover. Malin Space Science Systems, San Diego, California, USA, built and operates the rover's Mastcam.

EPA/Nasa

A Nasa picture shows several frames of a dune valley on Mars, taken by the Mastcam on the rover Curiosity. The foreground dune at Dingo Gap is about 1 metre high in the middle and tapered at south and north ends onto low scarps on either side of the gap. The image has been white-balanced to show what the rocks would look like if they were on Earth. Read more

 Antares Rocket  Launch

Bill Ingalls/NASA via Getty Images

The Antares rocket on Thursday launches from Nasa’s Wallops Flight Facility at Wallops Island, Virginia. Antares is carrying the Cygnus spacecraft in Orbital Sciences’ first cargo resupply mission for Nasa

Solar Dynamics Observatory Shows Sun's Rainbow of Wavelengths...epa03995749 An undated handout picture released by NASA on 19 December 2013 shows a still image taken from a NASA movie of the sun based on data from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), showing the wide range of wavelengths, invisible to the naked eye, that the telescope can view. SDO converts the wavelengths into an image humans can see, and the light is colorized into a rainbow of colors. Yellow light of 5,800 Angstroms, for example, generally emanates from material of about 5,700 degree Celsius, which represents the surface of the sun. Extreme ultraviolet light of 94 Angstroms, which is typically colorized in green in SDO images, comes from atoms that are about 6,300,000 degree Celsius and is a good wavelength for looking at solar flares, which can reach such high temperatures. By examining pictures of the sun in a variety of wavelengths, as it is done not only by SDO, but also by NASA's Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph, NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory and the European Space Agency/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory; scientists can track how particles and heat move through the sun's atmosphere.  EPA/NASA GODDARD SPACE FLIGHT CENTER  HANDOUT EDITORIAL USE ONLY

EPA/Nasa

This picture released by Nasa shows a still image taken from a video of the sun taken by Nasa’s Solar Dynamics Observatory – it shows a wide range of wavelengths invisible to the naked eye Read more

Soyuz TMA-11M rocket is launched with Expedition 38 Soyuz Commander Mikhail Tyurin of Roscosmos, Flight Engineer Rick Mastracchio of NASA and Flight Engineer Koichi Wakata of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency onboard, November 7, 2013 at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Tyurin, Mastracchio, and, Wakata will spend the next six months aboard the International Space Station.

Bill Ingalls/NASA/AFP

The Soyuz TMA-11M rocket is launched on Thursday at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Expedition 38 Soyuz commander Mikhail Tyurin of Roscosmos, flight engineer Rick Mastracchio of NASA and flight engineer Koichi Wakata of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency are on board.

This image obtained from NASA August 27,...This image obtained from NASA August 27, 2013 shows from more than 40 countries and 30 US states, people around the world as they shared more than 1,400 images of themselves as part of the Wave at Saturn event organized by NASA's Cassini mission. That event on July 19, 2013, marked the day the Cassini spacecraft turned back toward Earth to take our picture as part of a larger mosaic of the Saturn system. The images came via Twitter, Facebook, Flickr, Instagram, Google+ and email. The mission has assembled this collage from the shared images, using an image of Earth as the base image. AFP PHOTO / NASA/JPL-Caltech == RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE / MANDATORY CREDIT: "AFP PHOTO / NASA/JPL-Caltech / NO MARKETING / NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS / DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS == HO/AFP/Getty Images

Ho/Nasa/AFP

This Nasa image released on Tuesday shows a mosaic of photos from around the world collected as part of the Wave at Saturn event organised by those behind the US space agency’s Cassini mission. The event on July 19 marked the day the Cassini spacecraft turned back towards Earth to take a picture as part of a larger mosaic of the Saturn system. The images came via Twitter, Facebook, Flickr, Instagram, Google+ and email

photo provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration NASA on 10 June 2013 shows NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy, an Expedition 36 flight engineer, using a 400mm lens on a digital still camera to photograph a target of opportunity on Earth some 250 miles below him from inside the 'Cupola' of the International Space Station ISS. Cassidy has been aboard the orbital outpost since late March and will continue his stay into September 2013, NASA said. The Cupola, a dome shaped module with windows, was launched and installed as a panoramic control tower for operations outside of the ISS, in 2010.

Nasa/EPA

Nasa astronaut Chris Cassidy, an Expedition 36 flight engineer, uses a 400mm lens on a digital still camera to photograph a target of opportunity on Earth, some 250 miles below him from inside the “Cupola” of the International Space Station. Mr Cassidy has been aboard the orbital outpost since late March and will stay until September, Nasa said. The Cupola, a dome-shaped module with windows, was launched and installed as a panoramic control tower for operations outside of the ISS in 2010.