Passover

Ultra-Orthodox Jews burn leavened items in a final preparation before the start at sundown of the Jewish Pesach (Passover) holiday, on April 14, 2014 in Jerusalem. Religious Jews worldwide eat matzoth during the eight-day Pesach holiday that commemorates the Israelis' exodus from Egypt some 3,500 years ago and their ancestors' plight by refraining from eating leavened food products.

Gali Tibbon/AFP

Ultra-Orthodox Jews burn leavened items in a final preparation before the start at sundown of the Jewish Pesach (Passover) holiday, on Monday in Jerusalem

Members of the ancient Samaritan community attend the pilgrimage for the holy day of Passover at the religion's holiest site on the top of Mount Gerizim near the West Bank town of Nablus, early Tuesday, April 30, 2013. According to tradition, the Samaritans are descendants of Jews who were not deported when the Assyrians conquered Israel in the 8th century B.C. Of the small community of close to 700 people, half live in a village at Mount Gerizim, and the rest in the city of Holon near Tel Aviv. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit)

Ariel Schalit/AP

Members of the Samaritan community attend the pilgrimage for the holy day of Passover at the religion’s holiest site on the top of Mount Gerizim near the West Bank town of Nablus, early on Tuesday. According to tradition, the Samaritans are descendants of Jews who were not deported when the Assyrians conquered Israel in the 8th century BC.