Pastoruri glacier

Members of the glaciology unit of Peru's national water authority walk on the Pastoruri glacier in Huaraz, Peru, Thursday, Dec. 4, 2014. The glaciology unit is studying the measurement of ice thickness. According to Alejo Cochachin, coordinator of the glaciology unit, the Pastoruri glacier retreated 576 meters between 1980 and 2014. Peru's glaciers have lost more one-fifth of their mass in just three decades, and the 70 percent Peruís 30 million people who inhabit the countryís Pacific coastal desert, depend on glacial runoff for hydropower and to irrigate crops, meaning their electricity and long-term food security could also be in peril. Higher alpine temperatures are killing off plant and animal species in cloud forests and scientists predict Pacific fisheries will suffer. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)

Rodrigo Abd/AP

Members of the glaciology unit of Peru’s national water authority walk on the Pastoruri glacier in Huaraz, Peru. The glaciology unit is measuring ice thickness and according to Alejo Cochachin at the unit, the Pastoruri glacier retreated 576 metres between 1980 and 2014 

An ice cave at the leading edge of the Pastoruri glacier is seen in Huaraz...An ice cave at the leading edge of the Pastoruri glacier is seen in Huaraz, September 19, 2013. The Pastoruri glacier is one of the fastest receding glaciers in the Cordillera Blanca mountain range according to a 2012 paper by the University of Texas and the Huascaran National Park. Peru is home to 71% of the worldís tropical glaciers, which are a source of fresh water for millions, but 22% of the surface area of Peruvian glaciers has disappeared in the past 30 years alone, according to The World Bank. Environmental issues are under the spotlight during a working group of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, who are meeting in Stockholm from September 23-27. Picture taken September 19, 2013.  REUTERS/Mariana Bazo

Mariana Bazo/Reuters

The Pastoruri glacier in Huaraz is one of the fastest receding glaciers in the Cordillera Blanca mountain range, according to a 2012 paper by the University of Texas and the Huascaran National Park. Peru is home to 71 per cent of the world’s tropical glaciers, which are a source of fresh water for millions, but 22 per cent of the surface area of Peruvian glaciers has disappeared in the past 30 years alone, according to the World Bank. Environmental issues are under the spotlight during a meeting of a working group of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change in Stockholm from September 23-27.