poppy

Afghan farmers collect raw opium as they work in a poppy field in Khogyani district of Jalalabad, east of Kabul, Afghanistan, Friday, May 10, 2013. Opium poppy cultivation has been increasing for a third year in a row and is heading for a record high, the U.N. said in a report. Poppy cultivation is also dramatically increasing in areas of the southern Taliban heartland, the report showed, especially in regions where thousands of U.S.-led coalition troops have been withdrawn or are in the process of departing. The report indicates that whatever international efforts have been made to wean local farmers off the crop have failed.

Rahmat Gul/AP

Afghan farmers collect raw opium as they work in a poppy field in Khogyani district of Jalalabad, east of Kabul in Afghanistan. Opium poppy cultivation has been increasing for a third year in a row and is heading for a record high, the UN said in a report. Poppy cultivation is also increasing in areas of the southern Taliban heartland, the report showed, especially in regions where thousands of US-led coalition troops have been withdrawn or are in the process of departing. The report indicates that whatever international efforts have been made to wean local farmers off the crop have failed.

Afghan farmers work in their poppy field in Khogyani District of Nangarhar province on April 29, 2013. Poppy cultivation is expected to increase in both eastern and western provinces of the country, though will remain at a much lower level of cultivation as compared to Helmand and Kandahar provinces, the United Nations office on Drugs and Crimes (UNODC) said in its 2012 report.

Noorullah Shirzada/AFP

Afghan farmers work in their poppy field in Khogyani District of Nangarhar Province. Poppy cultivation is expected to increase in both eastern and western provinces of the country, though will remain at a much lower level of cultivation compared to Helmand and Kandahar Provinces, the UN Office on Drugs and Crimes (UNODC) said in its 2012 report.