Sittwe

A boy looks from his temporary shelter at a Rohingya refugee camp as Myanmar's government embarks on a national census, in Sittwe April 2, 2014. At least 20,000 people in displacement camps around Sittwe will run out of drinking water within 10 days, while food stocks will run out within two weeks, imperilling thousands more. In the absence of nongovernment organisations (NGOs), the United Nations is working with the government to bring emergency supplies to camps, but that is only a short-term solution, said Pierre Peron, a spokesman for the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. The evacuation of aid workers came as Myanmar prepared to launch its first census since 1983, which sparked controversy because it included questions on religion and ethnicity. Those are sensitive subjects in a country riven by sectarian tensions and especially in Rakhine, which is home to a million mostly stateless Rohingya whom the government refers to as Bengali, implying they are illegal immigrants from Bangladesh

Soe Zeya Tun/Reuters

A boy at in a temporary shelter at a Rohingya refugee camp in Myanmar, where the government is conducting a national census. At least 20,000 people in displacement camps around Sittwe will run out of drinking water within 10 days, while food stocks will run out within two weeks, imperilling thousands more. The UN is working with the government to bring emergency supplies to camps, but that is only a short-term solution, said Pierre Peron, a spokesman for the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs

A Muslim Rohingya man works on constructing a tent after arriving back to a camp for iternally displaced people in the village of Mansi on the outskirts of Sittwe on May 17, 2013.  Bangladesh and Myanmar cleaned up on May 17 after a killer cyclone wrecked thousands of homes, relieved that the damage was not much worse after the storm weakened as it made landfall. At least 40 people were either killed by Cyclone Mahasen or while trying to flee its impact, including 25 Muslim Rohingya whose bodies washed up on the shores of Bangladesh after their boat capsized while sailing from Myanmar.

Soe Than Win/AFP

A Muslim Rohingya man works on constructing a tent after arriving back to a camp for internally displaced people in the village of Mansi on the outskirts of Sittwe, Myanmar, on Friday. After a killer cyclone wrecked thousands of homes, Bangladesh and Myanmar were relieved that the damage was not much worse after the storm weakened as it made landfall. At least 40 people were either killed by Cyclone Mahasen or while trying to flee its impact, including 25 Muslim Rohingya whose bodies washed up on the shores of Bangladesh after their boat capsized while sailing from Myanmar.

Internally displaced Rohingya women sit in the back of a truck ready to leave their camp in Sittwe, northwestern Rakhine State, Myanmar, Thursday, May 16, 2013. Tens of thousands of displaced Rohingya people live in the plastic-roofed tents and huts made of reeds, and they distrust nearly any order from a government that barely acknowledges they exist. Even as rain and wind from the edges of Cyclone Mahasen began to pelt the coast near the city on Thursday morning, most people camped there appeared to be staying put. Some, however, were taking down their tents and hauling their belongings away in cycle-rickshaws, or carrying them in bags balanced on their heads. (AP Photo/Gemunu Amarasinghe)

Gemunu Amarasinghe/AP

Internally displaced Rohingya women sit in the back of a truck ready to leave their camp in Sittwe, northwestern Rakhine State, Myanmar on Thursday. Tens of thousands of displaced Rohingya people who live in the plastic-roofed tents and reed huts distrust orders from a government that barely acknowledges their exist. So even as rain and wind from the edges of cyclone Mahasen began to pelt the coast near the city on Thursday morning, most people camped there appeared to be staying put. Some, however, were taking down their tents and hauling their belongings away in cycle-rickshaws, or carrying them in bags balanced on their heads

Rohingya women sit in front of their rel...Rohingya women sit in front of their relief tent at the Mansi Internally Displaced Persons (IDP) camp on the outskirts of Sittwe on May 15, 2013. A cyclone threatening to lash low-lying coastal areas of Bangladesh and Myanmar appears to have weakened, but still poses a risk to more than eight million people, according to the UN.  AFP PHOTO / SOE THAN WINSoe Than WIN/AFP/Getty Images

Soe Than Win/AFP

Rohingya women sit in front of their relief tent at the Mansi Internally Displaced Persons (IDP) camp on the outskirts of Sittwe on Wednesday. A cyclone threatening to lash low-lying coastal areas of Bangladesh and Myanmar appears to have weakened, but still poses a risk to more than 8 million people, according to the UN. 

An internally displaced Rohingya boy wraps himself with a sarong as he walks in rain at a makeshift camp for Rohingya people in Sittwe, northwestern Rakhine State, Myanmar, ahead of the arrival of Cyclone Mahasen, Tuesday, May 14, 2013. The U.N. said the cyclone, expected later this week, could swamp makeshift housing camps sheltering tens of thousands of Rohingya.  Myanmar state television reported Monday that 5,158 people were relocated from low-lying camps in Rakhine state to safer shelters. But far more people are considered vulnerable.

Gemunu Amarasinghe/AP

A Rohingya boy wraps himself with a sarong as he walks in the rain at a makeshift camp for displaced Rohingya people in Sittwe, northwestern Rakhine, Myanmar, ahead of Cyclone Mahasen. The UN said the cyclone, expected later this week, could swamp makeshift housing camps sheltering tens of thousands of Rohingya.

Hla Hla May, a Rohingya Muslim woman displaced by violence, holds her one-year-old daughter Roshan at a former rubber factory that now serves as their shelter, near Sittwe.   REUTERS/Damir Sagolj

Damir Sagolj/Reuters

Hla Hla May, a Rohingya Muslim woman displaced by violence, holds her one-year-old daughter Roshan at a former rubber factory that now serves as their shelter, near Sittwe, Myanmar