Star

Massive star explosion in the Large Magellanic Cloud...epa04586376 A undated handout image made available by NASA on 26 January 2015 showing an expanding shell of debris called SNR 0519-69.0 is left behind after a massive star exploded in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy to the Milky Way. Multimillion degree gas is seen in X-rays from Chandra, in blue. The outer edge of the explosion (red) and stars in the field of view are seen in visible light from the Hubble Space Telescope. Chandra X-ray Center is releasing a set of images that combine data from telescopes tuned to different wavelengths of light.  EPA/NASA / CXC / SAO  HANDOUT EDITORIAL USE ONLY

Nasa/EPA

This Nasa image shows an expanding shell of debris left behind after a massive star exploded in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy to the Milky Way. Multimillion degree gas is seen in X-rays from Chandra, in blue. The outer edge of the explosion (red) and stars in the field of view are seen in visible light from the Hubble Space Telescope. 

Taken by the European Southern Observatory shows a view of the bright star cluster NGC 3532 captured by the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESOs La Silla Observatory in Chile. Some of the stars still shine with a hot bluish colour, but many of the more massive ones have become red giants and glow with a rich orange hue.

G. Beccari/European Southern Observatory/AFP

A bright star cluster (NGC 3532) captured by telescope at the La Silla Observatory in Chile, run by the European Southern Observatory. Some of the stars still shine with a hot bluish colour, but many of the larger ones glow with a rich orange hue

Dark Sky award for Isle of Man...Undated photo handout issued by www.visitisleofman.com of a very starry night sky on the Isle of Man, who have just been awarded one of the best places in the British Isles to star-gaze as the Dark Sky Discovery Network has announced that the Island now has a total of twenty six designated ìDark Sky Discovery Sitesî. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Monday January 6, 2014. Measuring just 32 miles long and 14 miles wide, the Isle of Man now has the largest concentration of Dark Skies sites in the British Isles, lying in some of the Islandís best beauty and heritage sites such as Cregneash historical village, Rushen Abbey and Peel Castle. Light pollution means that more than 85 per cent of the British population has never seen a truly dark sky, but with a low population density and few built up areas, the Isle of Man provides the perfect spot for stargazing. Those hoping to visit the destinations shouldnít worry about lack of access either, with sites awarded Dark Sky Discovery status on the basis of accessibility as well as being free enough from light pollution to get a good view of the stars. Photo credit should read: www.visitisleofman.com/PA Wire NOTE TO EDITORS: This handout photo may only be used in for editorial reporting purposes for the contemporaneous illustration of events, things or the people in the image or facts mentioned in the caption. Reuse of the picture may require further permission from the copyright holder.

www.visitisleofman.com/PA

A starry night sky on the Isle of Man, one of the best places in the British Isles to stargaze. The island has 26 designated Dark Sky Discovery Sites. Light pollution means that most Britons have never seen a truly dark sky, but its low population density and small number of built-up areas, makes the island an ideal location. 

A man look up at a starry night at Kielder Water, Northumberland.

Tom White/PA

Stargazer delight: a man takes in the beautiful spectacle of the unusually clear night sky over Kielder Water, Northumberland, northeast England, on Tuesday