sweets

Afghan men make special sweets at a traditional factory in preparation for Eid al-Fitr in Kabul...Afghan men make special sweets at a traditional factory during the holy Muslim fasting month of Ramadan in preparation for Eid al-Fitr in Kabul July 24, 2014. REUTERS/Mohammad Ismail (AFGHANISTAN - Tags: RELIGION FOOD TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY)

Mohammad Ismail/Reuters

Afghan men make special sweets at a traditional factory during the holy Muslim fasting month of Ramadan in preparation for the Eid al-Fitr festival in Kabul on Thursday

Afghan worker prepares candies at a factory in Herat, Afghanistan, 16 April 2014. The economy of Afghanistan has improved significantly since 2002 due to the induction of billions of dollars in international aid and investments. The recent improvement is also due to remarkable progress in agricultural production especially Grapes, Pomegranates, Apricots, melons and superior Potatoes.

Jalil Rezayee/EPA

An Afghan worker prepares candies at a factory in Herat, Afghanistan on Wednesday. The nation’s economy has improved significantly since 2002 due to billions of dollars in international aid and investments.

Afghan workers make sweets at a traditio...Afghan workers make sweets at a traditional 'jelabi' (sweet) factory ahead of the Islamic holy month of Ramadan in Herat on July 8, 2013. Throughout the month, devout Muslims must abstain from food and drink from dawn until sunset when they break the fast with the Iftar meal. Traditionally, dates are known as the food the prophet Mohammad ate when he broke from his fast. AFP PHOTO / Aref KARIMIAref Karimi/AFP/Getty Images

Aref Karimi/AFP

Afghan workers make sweets at a traditional ‘jelabi’ (sweet) factory ahead of the Islamic holy month of Ramadan in Herat on Monday. Throughout the month, devout Muslims must abstain from food and drink from dawn until sunset when they break the fast with the Iftar meal. Traditionally, dates are known as the food the prophet Mohammad ate when he broke from his fast Read more

Afghan confectioners work at a traditional sweets factory in Herat on May 14, 2013. Some nine million Afghans or 36 percent of the population are living in "absolute poverty" while another 37 percent live barely above the poverty line, according to a UN report.

Aref Karimi/AFP

Afghan confectioners work at a traditional sweets factory in Herat. Some 9 million Afghans or 36 per cent of the population are living in “absolute poverty”, while another 37 per cent live barely above the poverty line, according to a UN report.