Tbilisi

TOPSHOT - A flock of birds fly on the sk...TOPSHOT - A flock of birds fly on the sky of Tbilisi on April 18, 2016. / AFP PHOTO / Vano ShlamovVANO SHLAMOV/AFP/Getty Images

Vano Shlamov/AFP/Getty

A flock of birds fly in the sky in Tbilisi, Georgia 

A boy plays inside a Soviet-era Yakovlev Yak-40 plane turned into their kindergarten in the Georgian city of Rustavi, some 25 km southeast of the capital Tbilisi, on Monday. Local head teacher Gari Chapidze bought the old but fully functional Yak-40 from Georgian Airways and refurbished its interior with educational equipment, games and toys but left the cockpit instruments intact so they could be used as play tools

Vano Shlamov/AFP

A boy plays inside a Soviet-era Yakovlev Yak-40 plane turned into their kindergarten in the Georgian city of Rustavi, some 25 km southeast of the capital Tbilisi, on Monday. Local head teacher Gari Chapidze bought the old but fully functional Yak-40 from Georgian Airways and refurbished its interior with educational equipment, games and toys but left the cockpit instruments intact so they could be used as play tools

Municipal workers examine the bottom of the Kura River after water was released from the dam in downtown Tbilisi, Georgia on Tuesday, June 30, 2015. Recent flooding, triggered by torrential rains, killed at least 19 people, destroyed houses and tore up roads. Six people remain missing

Shakh Aivazov/AP

Municipal workers examine the bottom of the Kura River after water was released from the dam in downtown Tbilisi, Georgia on Tuesday. Recent flooding, triggered by torrential rains, killed at least 19 people, destroyed houses and tore up roads

Participants march on the street during "Alilo",

David Mdzinarishvili/Reuters

Georgians take part in a religious procession known as Alilo, in Tbilisi, to celebrate the Orthodox Christmas

Commuters get out of a 60-year-old cable car in the town of Chiatura, some 220 km (136 miles) northwest of Tbilisi, September 12, 2013. Dating to the Soviet era, Chiatura's public cable cars were built to facilitate the manganese mining industry, which formed the bedrock of the town's economy. Sixty years later, 15 of Chiatura's 21 cable car routes are still running, covering a total length of over 6000 meters, and they are still the quickest and most convenient way of getting around, despite their advanced years.

David Mdzinarishvili/Reuters

Commuters leave a 60-year-old cable car in the town of Chiatura, some 220km northwest of Tbilisi. Dating to the Soviet era, Chiatura’s public cable cars were built to facilitate the manganese mining industry, which formed the bedrock of the town’s economy. Fifteen of Chiatura’s 21 cable car routes are still running, covering a total length of over 6,000 meters.