Tomb

Ultra-Orthodox Jewish men walk near the controversial Israeli barrier outside Rachel's tomb in Bethlehem

Finbarr O'Reilly/Reuters

Ultra-Orthodox Jewish men stand beneath a section of the controversial Israeli barrier outside Rachel’s tomb in the West Bank town of Bethlehem

Children pray for their ancestors after sweeping their family tombstones at a cemetery in Haiki, Nagasaki Prefecture, southern Japan, Wednesday, Aug. 13, 2014 as they celebrate the Bon Festival. Japanese believe that their ancestors' spirits return to their homes to reunite with their family during the three-day festival starting Aug. 13.

Eugene Hoshiko/AP

Children pray for their ancestors after sweeping family tombstones at a cemetery in Haiki, Nagasaki Prefecture, south Japan on Wednesday as they celebrate the Bon Festival.

TOPSHOTS Soldiers of the Presidential Re...TOPSHOTS Soldiers of the Presidential Regiment march during the Change of Guard ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Moscow, on April 9, 2014. AFP PHOTO / KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEVKIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/AFP/Getty Images

Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP

Soldiers of the Presidential Regiment march during the Change of Guard ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Moscow 

A woman hugs a terracotta warrior replicas as she post for a souvenir photo at the Museum of Qin Terracotta Warriors and Horses in Xi'an, in central China's Shaanxi province Tuesday, July 30, 2013. Thousands of terracotta soldiers that were buried in the tomb of the Emperor Qin Shihuang, who ruled China between 221-210 B.C., are displayed in Xi'an.

Andy Wong/AP

A woman hugs a terracotta warrior replica as she poses for a souvenir photo at the Museum of Qin Terracotta Warriors and Horses in Xi’an, Shaanxi province in central China on Tuesday.

Huge statues are shown in the early morning at the tomb of King Antiochus on top of Mount Nemrut near Adiyaman, southeastern Anatolia, Turkey. Nemrut (Nemrut Dagi) is a 2,134m high mountain, notable for its tomb, which was probably built for king Antiochus Theos of Kommagene who believed he was a descendant of Apollo in the first part of the first century BC. On two sides of the mountaintop terraces were set up for statues representing Apollo, Fortuna, Heracles and Zeus. The Mount Nemrut ruins were discovered in 1881 and declared a UN World Heritage Site in 1987.

Filip Singer/EPA

Huge statues are shown in the early morning at the tomb of King Antiochus on top of Mount Nemrut near Adiyaman, southeastern Anatolia, Turkey. Nemrut (Nemrut Dagi) is a 2,134m high mountain, notable for its tomb, which was probably built for king Antiochus Theos of Kommagene who believed he was a descendant of Apollo in the first part of the first century BC. On two sides of the mountaintop terraces were set up for statues representing Apollo, Fortuna, Heracles and Zeus. The Mount Nemrut ruins were discovered in 1881 and declared a UN World Heritage Site in 1987.