Ypres

A US army officer escorts US President Barack Obama (2nd-L), Belgium's King Philippe (2nd-R) and Belgian Prime Minister Elio Di Rupo (R) as they visit the WWI Flanders Field Cemetery in Waregem on Wednesday. The cemetery is the final resting place for 368 Americans, most of whom were killed during World War I. Obama will pay his first visit ever to the EU headquarters in Brussels, cementing US-EU opposition to the takeover of Crimea after hitting out at Russian expansionism as a "sign of weakness".

Belga/AFP

A US army officer escorts US President Barack Obama (2nd-L), Belgium’s King Philippe (2nd-R) and Belgian Prime Minister Elio Di Rupo (R) as they visit the WWI Flanders Field Cemetery in Waregem on Wednesday. The cemetery is the final resting place for 368 Americans, most of whom were killed during World War I. Obama will pay his first visit ever to the EU headquarters in Brussels, cementing US-EU opposition to the takeover of Crimea after hitting out at Russian expansionism as a “sign of weakness”.

World War Two veteran Harry Marrington, from Portsmouth, England, leans down to pick up a paper poppy during an Armistice Day ceremony under the Menin Gate in Ypres, Belgium. The Menin Gate Memorial bears the names of more than 54,000 British and Commonwealth soldiers who were killed in the Ypres Salient of World War I and whose graves are not known.

Virginia Mayo/AP

World War Two veteran Harry Marrington, from Portsmouth, England, leans down to pick up a paper poppy during an Armistice Day ceremony under the Menin Gate in Ypres, Belgium. The Menin Gate Memorial bears the names of more than 54,000 British and Commonwealth soldiers who were killed in the Ypres Salient of World War I and whose graves are not known.