Daily Archives: December 6, 2007

Richard Waters

Ma_bell_2 Last year’s fight in Washington over "net neutrality" will probably go down as just an early skirmish in a much longer battle between the network operators and the internet services companies.

The next front: which side reaps the lion’s share of the money for serving up targetted advertising to internet users. This has been the preserve of companies like DoubleClick, whose cookies track behaviour on the Web and use this to serve up relevant advertising, but there’s no technical reason why the network operators shouldn’t insert themselves into the process. Using gear designed for "deep packet analysis" (the same equipment that makes censorship on the internet possible), they could easily "listen in" on the traffic flowing across their networks to develop a far more precise picture of an internet user’s behaviour than the one available to DoubleClick. 

Richard Waters

Ma_bell_2 Last year’s fight in Washington over "net neutrality" will probably go down as just an early skirmish in a much longer battle between the network operators and the internet services companies.

The next front: which side reaps the lion’s share of the money for serving up targetted advertising to internet users. This has been the preserve of companies like DoubleClick, whose cookies track behaviour on the Web and use this to serve up relevant advertising, but there’s no technical reason why the network operators shouldn’t insert themselves into the process. Using gear designed for "deep packet analysis" (the same equipment that makes censorship on the internet possible), they could easily "listen in" on the traffic flowing across their networks to develop a far more precise picture of an internet user’s behaviour than the one available to DoubleClick. 

Richard Waters

Ritzcarlton_half_moon_bay_2 Over on the Left Coast, the turmoil in the New York markets certainly feels a long way away.

In fact, given what’s happening elsewhere, the mood today at one of Silicon Valley’s top financial conferences seems almost complacent (no doubt it owes something to the location, on a remote bluff overlooking the foggy Pacific Ocean.) 

Gangs of professional cyber criminals may be targeting a computer near you. That is just one of the messages contained in this week’s year-end wrap-up from F-Secure, the IT security specialists. F-Secure says their virus lab detected more than 500,000 pieces of malicious code this year, up from 250,000 last year.

But the trade in viruses, trojan horses and other sneaky programmes isn’t just getting bigger – it’s also getting more sinister as gangs of organised computer criminals have come to dominate the trade in viruses, worms, and other computer bugs. As F-Secure writes: