Daily Archives: July 30, 2009

Richard Waters

Microsoft has worked out a new way to disintermediate the bloggers and get its own voice out on the real-time Web.

If you can’t attend an important event, following someone who is live-blogging it is sometimes a good way to keep up with the news (we did it ourselves yesterday for the Microsoft/ Yahoo search announcement.)

But why leave it to highly opinionated, possibly erroneous intermediaries to get your message out? “Real-time” is coming to have an increasingly important influence on shaping how major events come to be seen – not so much the first draft of history as the first quick scribble. 

Chris Nuttall

The Applesphere has been abuzz this morning about the possibility of Steve Jobs giving a keynote speech at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas in January.

This emanates from a Wall Street Journal report of a dinner hosted by Gary Shapiro, Consumer Electronics Association president, in San Francisco on Tuesday night.

I was also at the dinner and have a transcript after the jump of the CEA president’s comments, which reveal Apple will have a big presence at CES, but only through third parties. 

Is there finally light at the end of the tunnel for embattled D-Ram memory chipmakers?  Research consultancy iSuppli seems to think so, and this week changed its near-term outlook rating for D-Ram suppliers to “positive” for the first time since last September.

In fact, D-Ram’s troubles had begun long before last September, with the market “stuck in a state of oversupply for nearly three years,” according to iSuppli chief analyst Nam Hyung Kim. 

Richard Waters

With advertisers like Martin Sorrell lining up to welcome Wednesday’s Microsoft/ Yahoo search pact, it might seem churlish for regulators to take a long hard look at the alliance. But that is exactly what they’re going to do – and there’s certainly no assurance that the deal will get the green light.

The babyfood business in the US provides the biggest warning sign. Back in 2000, Gerber controlled around two thirds of the US market for jarred babyfood – not that different from Google’s 77 per cent share of US search advertising, according to Microsoft’s figures. 

Chris Nuttall

Consumers worldwide spent nearly half a billion dollars on digital video software last year, according to a new study by John Peddie Research.

The firm predicts flat spending this year, partly due to the economic downturn but also because “consumers have made it very clear that they are not interested in difficult-to-use video editing software.”