Monthly Archives: October 2011

Tim Bradshaw

Anthony Rose, technical driving force behind the BBC iPlayer and before that Kazaa, this week returns to the start-up world with Zeebox, an iPad app designed to tap the growing trend for “dual screening”. 

Tim Bradshaw

For a company in the communication business, Whatsapp might be the least chatty start-up in Silicon Valley. The mobile-chat provider hit a huge milestone last week, with its users sending 1bn messages in a single day, it announced on Monday.

It’s a truly viral, word-of-mouth success story that’s all the more remarkable because it’s done so little press or marketing. 

When Taiwan’s Quanta landed orders from Facebook and Google to help custom-build their data centres earlier this year, it was the first step into a new industry for the world’s biggest contract maker of notebooks.

Quanta chairman Barry Lam’s said on Monday, however, that his ambitions go further than just completing built-to-order projects for tech companies. Quanta will instead look to offer a full turnkey solution for servers, he said for the first time. It is a move that will put it into direct competition with industry leaders like HP, Dell, IBM and Sun Microsystems. 

HTC has had an amazing run as it grew from anonymity to one of the top Android phonemakers. This has been reflected in its shipments, which have been record-breaking for the Taiwanese company for each of the last six quarters.

But is that run about to end, amid intensifying competition and a weak global economy? HTC said on Monday that it expects fourth-quarter shipments, and revenues, to be down slightly from the third quarter. 

Tech news from around the web:

Steve Jobs’ biological sister Mona Simpson has shared the eulogy she delivered for her brother at his memorial service with the New York Times.

9to5 Mac reports that Apple has acquired C3 Technologies, a company that creates 3D maps of cities and geographic features. 

With all the tablets and smart phones that fight for our attention, more traditional tech companies have been pushed to the background. Yet IBM and HP each managed to grab the attention of the tech world this week when IBM appointed Ginni Rometty as chief executive and HP announced it would keep its PC division. 

Google has revived its stuttering effort to conquer the living room with a new version of Google TV, the service that mixes the web with television.

A redesigned interface, an improved look for services such as YouTube, better ways of finding TV and movie content and the opening up of the Android Market to deliver TV-compatible applications are the main improvements announced by Google on Friday.

 

Tech news from around the web:

Social shopping site Groupon has launched ‘Reserve’  – a select premium service, according to PC Mag. Groupon – which has already introduced a loyalty program, Groupon Rewards  – is currently in the process of preparing for its $540m initial public offering. 

Google has upped the ante against Groupon in the increasingly flooded daily deals market, with a new personalization mechanism to help better target deals to subscribers – something Groupon has been trying to do for months with limited success. 

Maija Palmer

Nokia Lumia 800While Nokia was busy unveiling its new Windows smartphones at Nokia World on Wednesday, there was already speculation around the conference – will a Nokia Windows tablet follow?