Monthly Archives: May 2013

As India’s IT sector looks to new markets for growth, the country’s fourth largest IT company, Wipro, has announced that it will pay $30m for a minority stake in the privately held Opera Solutions, a US organisation that works in predictive and prescriptive data analytics.

That translates into helping companies use data to manage costs, risks and other areas of the business. It’s a high-value element of the IT sector that many Indian companies are trying to expand into as growth in other services has tailed off.

 

Chris Nuttall

Google’s Gmail is suffering disruption, with many corporate users reporting they are not receiving emails from the webmail service, which has more than 400m users worldwide.

While Google’s Apps Status Dashboard is reporting that Gmail is working normally, it indicates the related Postini Services are suffering from disruption. 

In a rare event, a crowdfunded start-up has gone on to raise mainstream venture capital.

Digital Spin, which raised £60,000 in August from platform Seedrs, has now received several times that amount from Passion Capital and Balderton, two of London’s most active venture funds. Could this be the start of growing links between amateur and professional early-stage investors? 

Robert Cookson

What does Bitcoin have in common with 3D printing, besides both being technologies loved by geeks? On the face of it, not much: one is a digital currency and the other allows you to reproduce almost any small, solid object in the world.

But as lawmakers are starting to realise, there is a key similarity: both Bitcoin and 3D printing have the potential to reduce the power of the state and put it into the hands of individuals. 

Richard Waters

Why you would click a button labelled “start” to turn something off has never been entirely clear.

But for hundreds of millions of PC users, the start button in the bottom left corner of the Windows screen has been an invaluable navigation tool – which is why Microsoft looks to be on the verge of reversing course over Windows 8 and bringing it back. 

Chris Nuttall

The Fitbit is no longer fiddly.

Its San Francisco-based maker has removed my chief problem with this useful health tracker – launching a Fitbit Flex version today that straps to my wrist rather than the USB-stick shaped predecessor that was always getting lost in one of my pockets. 

Chris Nuttall

Adobe’s switch from boxed products to a software-as-a-service offering seems almost complete, with its Creative Cloud announcement at its annual Adobe MAX conference in Los Angeles today.

Henceforth, development has been halted on the traditional Creative Suite product and users are being urged to switch to Cloud if they want any updates. Adobe sees its future here in a monthly subscription model, similar to Microsoft’s strategy with its Office 365 online productivity suite. 

Chris Nuttall

Intel has unveiled the capabilities of a power-frugal Atom processor it says will make it more competitive in not just smartphones and tablets, but also in microservers and other market segments, including in-car entertainment.

Codenamed Silvermont, the new chip offers three times more peak performance than the previous Atom generation or five times lower power demands at the same performance, according to the company. It will debut on 22 nanometres – a circuit width that the rest of the industry has not matched thus far – and Intel will extend its efficiencies with a move to 14nm next year. 

Strike one up for the humble firewall, veteran of network security software.

McAfee, the 25-year-old security software maker founded by John McAfee and bought by Intel in 2011, has made a conditional offer for Finland’s Stonesoft, which makes military-grade firewalls for securing networks. 

Interesting commentary from around the Web on the tech story that made headlines this week.

Only a lucky group of applicants was selected to participate in testing the Explorer version of Google Glass. As early reviews started to trickle out this week, so too did a growing backlash against the “glassholes”.

While the elite of the tech world may be smitten – like Robert Scoble, who wrote he’s never taking his Google Glass off – others weren’t as easily impressed by the breakthrough in wearable computing, comparing it to overhyped tech toys such as the Segway and pocket protectors.