Monthly Archives: October 2013

Hannah Kuchler

Twitter released an updated version of its initial public offering filing on Tuesday afternoon in the US, announcing it will list on the NYSE and giving details about its last three months as a private company.

Here are five things you need to know from the messaging platform’s release:

1. Losses are mounting. Net losses widened significantly from June to September, rising from $70m in the first six months, to $134m for the first nine months as the cost of revenue increased. Read more

Ubisoft is ruining October for its investors and Christmas for video game fans with the news that its Watch Dogs game has been delayed till next springRead more

Tim Bradshaw

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Apple’s appearance on the catwalk with Burberry last month should have given us clues to more than next season’s fashions. Read more

Hannah Kuchler

Lookout, a leader in mobile security, has raised $55m in a fundraising round which saw Deutsche Telekom, the German telecoms company, and Qualcomm, the chipmaker.

The money will be used for expanding into selling its software to businesses and protecting the “Internet of Things”.

The San Francisco-based company also raised money from VC firms Greylock Partners and Mithril Capital Management, on top of getting more funding from its current investors Accel Partners, Andreessen Horowitz, Index Ventures and Khosla Ventures. Before this funding round, it had raised $76.5m in total.

John Hering, co-founder and chief executive, said the company wants to become the leading security firm for the “post-PC era” and hopes to work closely with Qualcomm to develop security software for the new wave of devices which are being connected to the internet. Read more

Windows 8 was panned and blamed for a historic fall in PC sales earlier this year, so let’s give some love to other versions of Microsoft’s much-maligned operating system in a look at the latest PC figuresRead more

Chris Nuttall

It may be getting chilly for barbecuing sausages on BioLite’s new attachment to its twig-powered camp stove, but be warmed by the satisfaction of knowing you are helping its efforts to save lives in developing countries.

The US company is leveraging its success with outdoors types to help fund its longer-term project of providing safer stoves for the half of the world’s population that still cooks on open wood fires every day. Read more

Samsung’s unveiling of its first curved smartphone screen today has bent out of shape a few reviewers and analysts. Read more

Tim Bradshaw

Nest, one of Silicon Valley’s best-known hardware startups, unveiled the follow-up to its “smart thermostat” on Tuesday: a talking smoke alarm that can send alerts to an app.

The Nest Protect has already received praise for its slick design and imaginative touches, such as motion-sensing nightlights and a woman’s voice to warn more gently of rising smoke than the traditional buzzer. These are not features you often associate with a humble smoke alarm. Read more

The BBC’s iPlayer is arguably the most successful effort by a broadcaster to embrace the internet age, so when the market leader talks about a next-generation version, the industry ought to sit up and take notice of what could become the future of TV. Read more

Hannah Kuchler

Twitter took advantage of the new Jobs Act to file the drafts of its initial public offering document in secret, denying journalists and investors the chance to watch its rough and tumble with the SEC.

But when the registration document was published on Thursday, the SEC also revealed the draft filings Twitter had made since it filed in private way back in July. There’s no big secret hiding here but a few interesting changes that give an indication of what Twitter may have been talking to the SEC about – although of course, they could have just decided to change it themselves. Read more

As Twitter’s IPO cranks into action, there is one big question that is puzzling beyondbrics and many others: where are the non-US users based?

In its SEC filing, Twitter admitted that “users outside the US constituted 77 per cent of our average MAUs [monthly active users] in the three months ended June 30, 2013″. Just who are the 77 per cent? And can Twitter make money out of them?

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Hannah Kuchler

Twitter’s S-1 registration document has landed, dishing out the detail on how much the messaging platform wants to raise in its upcoming offering, its business performance and its plans for the future. Follow our live blog as a team of FT reporters scours the 247-page filing for the most interesting tidbits and we compile reaction from across the web. 

It’s not just Apple and The Graduate that think plastic is fantastic. Read more

Hannah Kuchler

Sunday night’s US finale of Emmy award-winning TV series Breaking Bad sent viewers flocking to their laptops to hear a song played on the programme, boosting downloads of the 1970s British rock band Badfinger’s hit “Baby Blue” by almost 3000 per cent this week. In the last hours of Sunday night, the track was bought 5,300 times, compared to 200 the week before.

As TV viewers got ready to wean themselves off their addiction to the Crystal Meth fest, they found comfort in being able to instantly hear the song featured on the show, as well as other Badfinger songs. Sales of those tunes increased their sales by up to 260 per cent.

But according to the data from research firm Nielsen, the real story is in the streaming. Read more

Richard Waters

Step into the San Francisco offices of Climate Corporation, and the first thing you see is a giant suspended globe. It is a dramatic representation of the power of big data: cloud formations move across it in real time, attesting to the level of detail with which the company captures and models weather information.

Now, with Climate Corp’s sale to Monsanto for an up-front payment of $930m (with more cash set aside for staff retention), the big data business has its first significant acquisition, and an important vindication for those who argue that data analytics is becoming a competitive differentiator. Read more

Hannah Kuchler

Ladies and gentleman, the moment you have all been waiting for is fast-approaching: Twitter is due to file the small print on its initial public offering, a bulky S-1 registration statement that will allow investors a peek into the messaging platform’s business.

Here is the Financial Times “Ctrl-F” guide to getting the news fast (Alternatively, please tune in to FT.com when it happens, where we’ll do the heavy lifting for you): Read more

Richard Waters

First, for Google’s opponents, let’s look on the bright side.

The company’s tentative deal with European regulators in April to head off a formal anti-trust complaint was, according to critics, worse than useless. In the words of Silicon Valley lawyer Gary Reback: “They were Nowheresville”.

Tuesday’s revised deal at least fixes the most glaring flaws. Whether it will do anything meaningful to change the competitive situation is another matter. Read more

Getting a new global online payment standard adopted is a tall order, but the involvement of the big three – Visa, Mastercard and American Express – in the latest effort must give it a fighting chance of success. Read more

There is more than one way to lead in the smartphone industry, and China is at work on all of them.

No longer content to copy foreign products. China is developing brands to compete with Apple and Samsung. Xiaomi is known as its answer to Apple, and Huawei and ZTE, the equipment companies, have moved into handsets.

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