Monthly Archives: November 2013

Hannah Kuchler

Apple, the world’s largest public company by market capitalisation, has a problem. The lawyer appointed to ensure it is not price-fixing e-book sales is just too expensive.

The iPhone and iPad maker complained to the New York court this week that Michael Bromwich’s $1,100 an hour fee is “excessive” and he has not justified it as either “reasonable” or customary”. 

Richard Waters

It’s financing season for cloud storage. With Dropbox reported to be looking for another $250m and Box working towards an IPO, the company hoping to stake a claim to being the number three independent name just took in a more modest round of $34m.

Hightail – the new name of file-transfer company YouSendIt – has been in the business longer than its bigger rivals and needs to step on the gas if it wants to be a player in a market that is destined for consolidation before long. 

Richard Waters

Europe may be more sensitive to breaches of online privacy, but the US has levied larger penalties when things go wrong.

The latest case in point: the $17m that Google agreed on Monday to pay to a group of US states and the District of Columbia to resolve complaints that it circumvented cookie controls in Apple’s Safari browser. According to Google’s critics, however, it is still too easy for the company to buy its way out of trouble. 

Is there any privacy in the afterlife? In the FT this weekend, April Dembosky looks at what happens to personal data after death. Here, she adds a coda on how social media is recycled into memorials – regardless of the wishes of the deceased’s loved ones.

Of the various digital details Jennifer Kwong had to deal with after her fiancé’s death, the mass media’s trawling of social media sites was not one she expected. 

Hannah Kuchler

Pinterest, the online scrapbook recently valued at $3.8bn, will allow companies including Walmart, Nestle and Random House to show off the most popular pins about their products on their own websites. 

The smartphone as social enterprise: that is the pitch for Moto G, the latest product from Google-owned Motorola that went on sale on Wednesday for $179.

It also makes business sense for the struggling division, which might find it easier to rise above a pack of voracious competitors by focusing its efforts on faster-growing, more malleable emerging markets. 

Some newspapers hate Google, so trust the Economist to be contrary and hire its executive chairman.

The Economist Group said that Eric Schmidt (pictured) had joined its board for a three-year term.

Schmidt is, of course, only the latest internet evangelist to get his hands grubby with news. Amazon’s Jeff Bezos paid $250m to buy the Washington Post, while eBay’s founder Pierre Omidyar is investing a similar amount in an investigative outlet to be fronted by Glenn Greenwald

Chris Nuttall

The PlayStation 4 is a key element of Sony’s attempt at a turnaround under Sir Howard Stringer’s successor Kaz Hirai, and the first reviews are now in on the new console, which goes on sale in the US on Friday. 

Industry watchers scrutinise Apple announcements as hard as a customer might look at its high-resolution Retina displays, trying to see the individual pixels that are supposed to be indistinguishable to the human eye.

Thus, this morning’s announcement – that the iPad mini with its own new Retina display is now on sale – will be subject to the usual intense analysis. 

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