Monthly Archives: July 2014

This is the launch of the century in Chinese video gaming terms. Read more

Tim Bradshaw

Fuseproject, the San Francisco design agency led by Yves Béhar, has agreed to sell a majority stake to China’s fast-growing marketing group BlueFocus.

Mr Béhar – whose designs can be seen in products from Jawbone, Puma and One Laptop Per Child – sat down with the FT to talk about the deal, the company he founded in 1999 and what happens next. The transcript has been edited for length. Read more

Tim Bradshaw

Nest’s smart thermostat costs $250. littleBits wants you to make your own for $59. Read more

Hannah Kuchler

Apple beat earnings expectations but disappointed investors with its revenue forecast for next quarter, scuppering hopes that the share price could rapidly return to its all-time high of $100. Shares have dipped 1 per cent in after hours trading in New York on the back of this lower-than-expected guidance. However, muted sales of the iPhone and iPad in Apple’s third quarter did not prevent it from beating analysts’ earnings forecasts. Earnings of $1.28 per share compared favourably with analysts’ consensus estimates of $1.23, with gross margins reaching 39.4 per cent, a sharp increase over the prior year.

Join the FT’s Tim Bradshaw and Hannah Kuchler as they live blog the earnings call of the world’s largest company by market capitalisation.  

Tim Bradshaw

After the market closes on Tuesday, Apple releases its third quarter earnings for the three months to the end of June. Its stock price has risen by more than 20 per cent since it beat forecasts with its last quarterly numbers, taking it close to its-all time high. Can Apple repeat the trick in what are likely to be the last results before the next iPhones arrive, and push its stock to $100?

Here’s what Wall Street is looking for this quarter: Read more

For the past year, new internet subscribers in the UK have had to make an “unavoidable choice”.

No, it’s not whether to pay for speeds of 152Mb per second, or whether to subscribe to Premiership football. It’s whether to turn on a “family-friendly network filter”, affectionately known as porn blockers.

And what did Brits decide? Read more

Xiaomi’s latest flagship smartphone looks much like Apple’s rival handsets except for one crucial difference: the price – which is less than half that of the similarly metallic iPhone 5s from the US group.

The steel handset was unveiled in Beijing by chief executive Lei JunLei on Tuesday, with reports that the crowd murmured “iPhone” as it was unveiled. Hugo Barra, the Google executive who joined Xiaomi as global vice-president last year, was also at the event. Read more

Arm shares are being treated like royalty today, despite being disdained as commoners at the open. Read more

Forgotten about Bing? Well, Bing has not forgotten about you.

Microsoft has joined Google in taking requests from European citizens who want embarrassing or sensitive results stripped from its search results, in response to the continent’s new “right to be forgotten” online. Read more

Tim Bradshaw

Two experiments by Snapchat this week point the way towards the photo-sharing app’s first sources of income, almost nine months after it turned down Facebook’s $3bn acquisition offerRead more

Tim Bradshaw

Apple found itself again in the firing line of China’s state media on Friday, when CCTV accused its iPhones of threatening national security due to their location tracking features.

At a time when sensitivities over US government surveillance are at an all-time high and when Chinese smartphone manufacturers are taking on the iPhone like never before, there could be many ulterior motives for this latest attack.

Nonetheless, many iPhone owners outside China may also be surprised to know how much their device knows about where they have been – including its uncanny ability to guess where you live and work. Read more

Sounds like a bad week for Moore’s Law at the microchip industry’s big annual Silicon Valley get-together. Read more

Sarah Mishkin

It’s already obvious that investment into start-ups is booming, and new data out today shows just how loudly the market is roaring. Read more

Richard Waters

CEOs love talking about the need for focus. But they’re not so good at picking things they’re not going to do as a result.

Satya Nadella has made a start. Five months after moving into the top job, he has finally admitted that the Xbox is not a core part of Microsoft’s business. What he hasn’t said yet is what he’s going to do with it. Read more

Richard Waters

Until now, Facebook has struggled – and failed – to strike the right note in response to the disquiet over its deliberate alteration of users’ moods for a research study.

On Wednesday it got another chance, as Senator Mark Warner wrote to the Federal Trade Commission asking it to investigate. What Facebook came up with in response still didn’t classify as an actual apology, but at least the company no longer sounded so bemused by all the fuss. Read more

To accompany its preliminary quarterly earnings guidance on Tuesday, Samsung Electronics for the first time issued an explanatory note, to address “investors’ concerns about uncertainties”. Here are some of the key issues facing shareholders after Samsung’s 24 per cent year-on-year earnings decline. Read more

Richard Waters

Venture capitalists are lining up to back bitcoin start-ups. On Monday, Xapo bagged some of Silicon Valley’s biggest names for its latest $20m round: Greylock’s Reid Hoffman and Index Ventures’ Mike Volpi, not to mention personal money from Max Levchin, Yuri Milner and Jerry Yang.

But all of this VC activity raises an interesting question. If these investors truly believe the crypto-currency will one day support a significant new financial services industry, why not just buy the currency and hold it? Read more

Online video distribution network Rightster is adding views with the bolt-on acquisitions of Viral Spiral and Base79. A placing of 75m new shares to raise £42m will help fund the deals – with a co-founder of YouTube coming on board and investing. Read more

Tim Bradshaw

Uber is wasting little time in putting last month’s huge $1.2bn fundraising to work. As it races for marketshare against not-quite-so-well-funded rivals such as Lyft, it has been cutting prices for its cheapest service, UberX, in several markets including its largest, the San Francisco Bay Area.

The fare reduction is flagged as temporary, which may be just as well: Fortune discovered that Uber is losing money on every fare by paying drivers more than it charges passengers, in order to boost their earnings and prevent them from switching to a more lucrative rival. Read more