Is Silicon Valley drying up? David O Sacks, founder and CEO of enterprise social network service Yammer, certainly seems to think so. Others, like Marc Andreessen, disagree. That makes for a lively debate, and it is taking place on perhaps the most apt forum of all – Facebook, writes Vinjeru Mkandawire and Robin Kwong.

“I think Silicon Valley as we know it may be coming to an end,” wrote Sacks on his Facebook page over the weekend, just before the social networking site’s shares sank to half its initial offering price. Read more >>

After the success of last year’s wireless Play:3 speaker system , Sonos has brought out an addition to its music-player family: the Sub (pictured left, in black), writes Jeremy White.

Those familiar with Sonos will probably agree that its Play:3 speakers push out serious room-filling sounds and link with other units in range to offer up a home hi-fi network that’s refreshingly easy to set up. Read more >>

It is the moment in the summer holidays children dread: when the “Back to School” banners go up in local stores and parents start to tick off the list of classroom supplies for the new term. This year, Walmart, the US retailer, is trying to ease the pain with a dose of innovation. Its online Classrooms by Walmart site goes beyond a generic list of products all children need, and allows teachers to upload tailored requirements for individual classes. Some 60,000 supply lists are already online.

Continue reading: A foothold in Silicon Valley

Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates is a legend in the world of software, but the latest project of his Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation deals with a very physical, real world problem, writes Vinjeru Mkandawire.

The “Reinvent the Toilet Challenge” encourages the use of technology in a very different way from writing code for computer operating systems – Universities are asked to build toilets that operate without running water, electricity or a sewage system. Read more >>

Some good news for Acer — the PC-maker narrowly edged out Lenovo and HP as the largest notebook PC seller globally last quarter, writes Sarah Mishkin in Taipei.

Narrow here means narrow. Acer now has 15.4 per cent of the market. Tied for second place are Lenovo and HP, which each have 15.3 per cent, according to new research from Gartner.  Read more >>

In the second week of Apple v Samsung at a court in San Jose, their patent dispute took a more serious turn, after the titillating revelations of the first week included Apple designs for a 7in iPad, one with a kickstand and Samsung considering a Retina display-like tablet, writes Constance Nuttall.

Testimony from expert witnesses this week shifted the focus towards the patented materials. Those called by Apple claiming that aspects of certain Samsung smartphones and tablets were easily confused with Apple products, namely the iPhone and iPad. Read more >>

Amazon’s launch of a textbook rental service on Tuesday reads as major competition for the likes of Chegg and Kno, both known for their pure-play focus on providing digital and, in Chegg’s case, physical textbooks for college students, writes Constance Nuttall.

But the two are expanding their playbooks to deal with increased competition – Kno announced a pre-college service on Tuesday, while Dan Rosensweig,  Chegg chief executive, spoke to us about its service becoming much more than renting textbooks. Read more >>

PC-maker Acerhad said that it could post as low as zero per cent annual growth in the number of computers it ships this year.The announcement sent its shares tumbling 3 per cent, even though news that PC sales are freezing should hardly be surprising given the global economic slow down.Acer, the world’s third-largest computer vendor, had previously forecast 10 per cent annual growth in the number of computers it ships. That has now been trimmed to zero to 5 per cent growth, according to a company source.

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Rupert and Wendi Murdoch©AP

The guest list features Jordan’s king and queen, Italy’s prime minister, three mayors, two governors and the director of the CIA. But technology and media superpowers will be the focus of attention this week as Allen & Co hosts its annual moguls’ retreat in Sun Valley, Idaho.

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Now that the post-float hubbub has passed, it is clear that Facebook priced its initial public offering too aggressively. I don’t know if it was a quest for the bragging rights it felt went with a $100bn-plus valuation, but there was little or no consideration for the consequences. Instead of pricing the stock with some upward room for new investors, they let everyone who had invested earlier take the maximum out and cash in. Faced with high earnings expectations, Facebook will need to do more with a business model that is suspect at best. And now they are doing it with a full boat of shareholders who are underwater on their investment.

Continue reading: “Facebook lessons from a dotcom veteran”