As it turns its attention to making some serious money, Twitter recently moved to introduce ads on mobile apps. This week, however, the company decided to spend a little, with its acquisition of Posterous, a social blogging site. Posterous users worried about the future of the service and tech observers speculated whether Twitter would integrate the two services. 

The iPad was on everyone’s lips this week, even if there was puzzlement over what exactly to call the third generation tablet. It was not the iPad 3 or iPad HD as expected, but “the new iPad,” according to Apple. Name apart, the latest version’s hardware divided fans into two camps: those who were disappointed by the modest changes and those who claimed the announcement was “truly huge” for Apple.

 

Getty images

Gadget lovers may soon be adding glasses to their growing list of tech toys. This week, reports that Google will release “heads-up display glasses” by the end of the year spread quickly in the tech sphere.

Though Google did not confirm if it was working on glasses that will  “be able to stream information to the wearer’s eyeballs in real time”, as the New York Times and 9 to 5 Google reported, many speculated that such a product could be the start of “wearable computing”. 

Google’s latest privacy breach? Late in the week, a researcher at Stanford University discovered that Google and several other advertising companies were bypassing privacy settings in Apple’s Safari browser.

Although Google admitted it “now started removing these advertising cookies,” the news brought a fresh example of the risks of online browsing to Internet privacy. 

This week, Path, the social networking app, faced criticism for storing users’ information after Arun Thampi, a developer, discovered his iPhone’s address book was uploaded to Path’s servers without his permission.

While Dave Morin, CEO of Path, apologised in a post and vowed to delete the contacts from Path’s servers, tech commentators debated how iOS developers and Apple should deal with access to user data. 

This week, Facebook’s much-anticipated IPO filing gave a glimpse into the company’s financials and the thinking of its chief executive, Mark Zuckerberg.

For many commentators, the filing raised questions about whether Facebook can continue this pace of accelerated growth. 

Apple has done it again. For a brief moment last week, following the announcement that it beat quarterly forecasts with record numbers, the Silicon Valley company once again became the world’s most valuable company.

This time, though, things were different, with Tim Cook, who took over as Apple’s chief executive from co-founder Steve Jobs, now at the helm. 

This week brought black outs, shut downs and online protests as online piracy was placed at the forefront of tech news. While Congress announced that it suspended the proposed piracy bills, SOPA and PIPA, commentators wrote that the debate over how to reduce online piracy was not over yet. 

Twitter’s displeasure with Google’s “Search plus Your World” may have been the most loudly heard reaction,  but tech commentators also took to their blogs to criticise Google’s latest enhancement to personalised search this week. 

A month after sites such as Tumblr and Reddit encouraged their users to protest against the Stop Online Piracy Act, the fight against SOPA returned this week.