Sarah Mishkin

Uber’s been investing heavily in lobbying politicians around the country to allow it to operate, but new data out suggests that, at least in one respect, politicians are already big fans of the group. Read more

Robert Cookson

Taylor Swift clearly touched a nerve at Spotify last week when she pulled all of her music from the streaming service.

Daniel Ek, Spotify’s chief executive, has responded to her move by publishing a 1,800 word essay that defends the company’s business model and reveals some fascinating numbers about its growth. Read more

Robert Cookson

The Economist, the 171-year-old weekly magazine, is launching its first daily edition.

The new product, called The Economist Espresso, will be available from Friday via smartphone apps and email. It takes the form of a daily briefing that is designed to be read in a few minutes each morning, and is part of a drive to expand The Economist’s digital audience following the first circulation decline in more than a decade. Read more

Tim Bradshaw

As Apple readies its Watch, Jawbone is aiming for “the other wrist” with the latest update to its Up fitness tracker.

Rather than challenge the iPhone maker’s forthcoming smartwatch head on, Jawbone’s new Up3 wristband is smaller than its predecessor, packed with more sensors including heart-rate and skin temperature detectors, and costs almost half the price of Apple Watch. Read more

Tim Bradshaw

SoundCloud has secured its first licensing agreement with a major record label, after months of tough negotiations.

The deal with Warner Music will allow SoundCloud, which was valued at around $700m earlier this year, to unlock new sources of revenue through advertising and subscriptions. Read more

Richard Waters

Faddish mobile apps and instant 20-something billionaires have become the public face of Silicon Valley’s latest boom. But some in the tech industry have ambitious ideas that could have a far more profound impact on the world.

In the latest Weekend FT magazine, we report on some of the ideas that will shape the future. Also: our take on life on the front lines of the tech boom, including what it’s really like to run a start-up (hint: it’s not all stock options and free food).

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Ephemeral snaps and messages help the technology take on the form of a conversation Read more

Sarah Mishkin

Spanish bank BBVA has struck up a partnership with payments start-up Dwolla as the Spanish group continues trying to figure out how to integrate new digital technology into its core banking business.

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Richard Waters

IBM and Twitter executives were not short of extravagant claims on Wednesday as they announced a partnership to apply data from the network to real-time business decisions.

For example: “It’s no longer social data, it’s world data.” Also: “People talk about the internet of things, but we’ve already instrumented the human race.” Read more

Sarah Mishkin

The number of California residents whose personal data was stolen by hackers jumped six-fold between 2012 and last year, with nearly half of California’s residents affected by one of the year’s many data breaches, according to a new report by the state’s attorney general.

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Robert Cookson

The New York Times Company and Axel Springer are hoping that a little-known Dutch start-up called Blendle may hold the key to making money from news online.

The two media groups have paid a combined €3m to acquire a 23 per cent stake in Blendle, which was founded last year and styles itself as the “iTunes for journalism”.

Blendle was launched in the Netherlands in April and sells individual articles from a number of newspapers and magazines to internet users through its website and app. On average an article costs 20 cents. The pricing per article is set by the publishers and revenues are split 70:30 between the publisher and Blendle. If a reader doesn’t like an article, they can ask for a refund. Read more

Hannah Kuchler

It’s #ThrowbackThursday, where the internet celebrates all things Michael Jackson and dodgy haircut-related. For Facebook, it is a chance to announce a retro app called Rooms from its Creative Labs team, the engineers and designers who play around with creating different kinds of social apps that may not be every Facebook users’ cup of tea.

According to the blogpost that accompanied its launch on Thursday, Rooms is a throwback to the “early days of the web” when it was about “connecting to people who you would never encounter otherwise in your daily life”. Read more

There is something peculiarly impressive about the video below of Mark Zuckerberg, founder of Facebook, talking in Mandarin to students at Tsinghua University in Beijing. If nothing else, it shows a dedication to the country’s customs that very few foreign business leaders can match.

Mr Zuckerberg clearly has business motives for making the effort, in addition to his personal connections – Priscilla Chan, his wife, comes from a Chinese family and her mother speaks mostly Mandarin. Facebook is blocked in mainland China, along with other US internet companies, and wants restrictions to be loosened. Read more

By Helen Barrett

Before setting up her high-tech fine jewellery company, Kate Unsworth interviewed 350 women about their hyperconnected lives. She discovered an insight that seems to contradict received wisdom about what consumers want from wearable technology.

“This segment of the market wanted to find a way to disconnect – but they needed to be contactable at the same time,” she says.

As the luxury industry rushes to embrace wearable technology, many brands are seeking to emulate smart watches like the Apple Watch, which are chock-full of functions to immerse their wearers further into the digital world. But Ms Unsworth believes consumers want less information, not more. Read more

Sarah Mishkin

London’s burgeoning fintech scene is about to get a bit bigger as a US start-up with a board of former Wall Street chief executives starts expanding internationally.

Orchard, a online direct lending platform, just raised $12m in venture funding with plans to open an office in London to tap into the UK’s growing demand, and government support, for direct lending.

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John WrenTelevision’s $70bn advertising business isn’t dead yet. So says John Wren, chief executive of Omnicom, one of the world’s biggest advertising companies.

But Mr Wren’s message on Tuesday may be cold comfort to network executives who are seeing digital outlets grab more money once firmly earmarked for broadcast and cable.

“I believe that trend will continue. I don’t think TV’s dead,” Mr Wren told investors on Omnicom’s earnings call on Tuesday. He is the latest industry executive to acknowledge that the digital ad business is getting a boost from the proliferation of online content and from the valuable targeting data held by companies like Facebook. Read more

Tim Bradshaw

The Silicon Valley crowd loves Nest’s $250 thermostats and $99 smoke alarms. But while its $3.2bn acquisition by Google confirmed Nest as a defining company of the smart home, for many its designer appliances might seem a little on the pricey side.

Enter Leeo, a new smart-home company that wants to be the Nest for the rest of us. Read more

Barely two months after Apple admitted it was storing users’ data online in mainland China, reports emerged that hackers have tried breaking into its iCloud data.

Apple representatives in China declined to comment on the reports of the hacking attack, which were posted on GreatFire.org, a group that conducts research on Chinese internet censorship.

The revelations, if true, would be little surprise to China observers. But it would be a comeuppance for Apple whose decision to store users’ data in mainland servers underlined the tenuous balance that foreign tech companies must strike between commitment to customer security and the realities of the Chinese market. Read more

Tim Bradshaw

Apple just disrupted another industry: the analysts who are tasked with predicting its quarterly numbers.

During Monday’s earnings call, Tim Cook, chief executive, revealed that Apple will not disclose sales figures for its forthcoming Watch when it is released early next year. Read more

Hannah Kuchler

Jan Koum, WhatsApp’s chief executive officer and Facebook’s newest board member, apologised today for harassing an ex-girlfriend in a series of incidents that led to a restraining order being taken out against him.

Mr Koum‘s ex-girlfriend said he verbally and physically threatened her, harassed her at work and followed her through the campus of her community college. In court documents, filed in 1996 but discovered by Bloomberg, she also complained of “sexual harassment”. Read more