John WrenTelevision’s $70bn advertising business isn’t dead yet. So says John Wren, chief executive of Omnicom, one of the world’s biggest advertising companies.

But Mr Wren’s message on Tuesday may be cold comfort to network executives who are seeing digital outlets grab more money once firmly earmarked for broadcast and cable.

“I believe that trend will continue. I don’t think TV’s dead,” Mr Wren told investors on Omnicom’s earnings call on Tuesday. He is the latest industry executive to acknowledge that the digital ad business is getting a boost from the proliferation of online content and from the valuable targeting data held by companies like Facebook. Read more >>

Tim Bradshaw

The Silicon Valley crowd loves Nest’s $250 thermostats and $99 smoke alarms. But while its $3.2bn acquisition by Google confirmed Nest as a defining company of the smart home, for many its designer appliances might seem a little on the pricey side.

Enter Leeo, a new smart-home company that wants to be the Nest for the rest of us. Read more >>

Barely two months after Apple admitted it was storing users’ data online in mainland China, reports emerged that hackers have tried breaking into its iCloud data.

Apple representatives in China declined to comment on the reports of the hacking attack, which were posted on GreatFire.org, a group that conducts research on Chinese internet censorship.

The revelations, if true, would be little surprise to China observers. But it would be a comeuppance for Apple whose decision to store users’ data in mainland servers underlined the tenuous balance that foreign tech companies must strike between commitment to customer security and the realities of the Chinese market. Read more >>

Tim Bradshaw

Apple just disrupted another industry: the analysts who are tasked with predicting its quarterly numbers.

During Monday’s earnings call, Tim Cook, chief executive, revealed that Apple will not disclose sales figures for its forthcoming Watch when it is released early next year. Read more >>

Hannah Kuchler

Jan Koum, WhatsApp’s chief executive officer and Facebook’s newest board member, apologised today for harassing an ex-girlfriend in a series of incidents that led to a restraining order being taken out against him.

Mr Koum‘s ex-girlfriend said he verbally and physically threatened her, harassed her at work and followed her through the campus of her community college. In court documents, filed in 1996 but discovered by Bloomberg, she also complained of “sexual harassment”. Read more >>

First it was Vice, then came Buzzfeed. Now, Ozy has become the latest news start-up aimed at young, digital natives to ramp up its offering on the back of a new injection of cash.

The California company backed by German publisher Axel Springer and Laurene Powell Jobs, widow of Apple co-founder Steve Jobs, is stepping up advertising and has hired Jonathan Dahl to become news editor from the Wall Street Journal. Read more >>

Hannah Kuchler

  Twitter users may notice a change to their timelines today, as the company that likes to boast of its real-time qualities makes its product a little less chronological.

Before this, the timeline was, as they say, one thing after another. But now, in the “spirit of experimentation and evolution”, Twitter will show users popular tweets they may have missed and even some tweets from people they don’t follow. Read more >>

Google faces a lot of questions on Europe’s new right to be forgotten ruling.

Should it notify a news website that it taking down links to one of its stories in its search results? Can famous people remove links to information about them created before they began to make headlines? Should those who fail to understand Facebook’s privacy settings be able remove information held in their social network profile from Google’s search results?

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At London swing of Google's advisory council hearings on #rtbf. Unlike the search engine, lots of questions, few answers

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These were among tricky dilemmas put today to Google’s “advisory council”: a group of independent experts advising the company on how to implement the European Court of Justice’s controversial decision in May. The court gave people the right to ask internet search engines to remove sensitive or embarrassing links to websites for queries that include their name. Deluged with hundreds of thousands of such takedown requests, Google wants the council to help develop policies to deal with the most difficult of cases.

 Read more >>

Tim Bradshaw

Apple is expected to unveil new iPads and Macs at a small event inside its Cupertino headquarters. But will it be enough to revive growth in a sluggish tablet market? Tim Bradshaw and Leslie Hook bring live updates from 1 Infinite Loop. 

Richard Milne

Angry Birds may be in free fall but two of the executives most responsible for its success are spreading their wings.

Just days after the company behind Angry Birds cut 16 per cent of its workforce amid disappointing growth, two former Rovio executives are launching their first game backed with $5m of venture capital money.

Andrew Stalbow, former head of strategic partnerships at Rovio and now chief executive at Seriously, said he hoped Thursday’s launch of Best Fiends would be the start of creating a mobile phone-centred entertainment brand. Read more >>