Tim Bradshaw

Apple found itself again in the firing line of China’s state media on Friday, when CCTV accused its iPhones of threatening national security due to their location tracking features.

At a time when sensitivities over US government surveillance are at an all-time high and when Chinese smartphone manufacturers are taking on the iPhone like never before, there could be many ulterior motives for this latest attack.

Nonetheless, many iPhone owners outside China may also be surprised to know how much their device knows about where they have been – including its uncanny ability to guess where you live and work. Read more

Sounds like a bad week for Moore’s Law at the microchip industry’s big annual Silicon Valley get-together. Read more

Sarah Mishkin

It’s already obvious that investment into start-ups is booming, and new data out today shows just how loudly the market is roaring. Read more

Richard Waters

CEOs love talking about the need for focus. But they’re not so good at picking things they’re not going to do as a result.

Satya Nadella has made a start. Five months after moving into the top job, he has finally admitted that the Xbox is not a core part of Microsoft’s business. What he hasn’t said yet is what he’s going to do with it. Read more

Richard Waters

Until now, Facebook has struggled – and failed – to strike the right note in response to the disquiet over its deliberate alteration of users’ moods for a research study.

On Wednesday it got another chance, as Senator Mark Warner wrote to the Federal Trade Commission asking it to investigate. What Facebook came up with in response still didn’t classify as an actual apology, but at least the company no longer sounded so bemused by all the fuss. Read more

To accompany its preliminary quarterly earnings guidance on Tuesday, Samsung Electronics for the first time issued an explanatory note, to address “investors’ concerns about uncertainties”. Here are some of the key issues facing shareholders after Samsung’s 24 per cent year-on-year earnings decline. Read more

Richard Waters

Venture capitalists are lining up to back bitcoin start-ups. On Monday, Xapo bagged some of Silicon Valley’s biggest names for its latest $20m round: Greylock’s Reid Hoffman and Index Ventures’ Mike Volpi, not to mention personal money from Max Levchin, Yuri Milner and Jerry Yang.

But all of this VC activity raises an interesting question. If these investors truly believe the crypto-currency will one day support a significant new financial services industry, why not just buy the currency and hold it? Read more

Online video distribution network Rightster is adding views with the bolt-on acquisitions of Viral Spiral and Base79. A placing of 75m new shares to raise £42m will help fund the deals – with a co-founder of YouTube coming on board and investing. Read more

Tim Bradshaw

Uber is wasting little time in putting last month’s huge $1.2bn fundraising to work. As it races for marketshare against not-quite-so-well-funded rivals such as Lyft, it has been cutting prices for its cheapest service, UberX, in several markets including its largest, the San Francisco Bay Area.

The fare reduction is flagged as temporary, which may be just as well: Fortune discovered that Uber is losing money on every fare by paying drivers more than it charges passengers, in order to boost their earnings and prevent them from switching to a more lucrative rival. Read more

Robert Cookson

Facebook has created a new “missed call” product for advertisers in India, marking the first time that the social network has designed a special ad format for a single country.

When a mobile phone user clicks on one of the ads, it calls the advertiser and immediately hangs up. The advertiser returns the call with pre-recorded entertainment content and a marketing message – enabling the consumer to avoid paying data charges.

Facebook’s creation of a special ad product in India, where the company has more than 100m users, is part of a broader push to develop customised solutions across emerging marketsRead more