Snapchat is growing faster than Facebook in video views, demand has gone stale for HelloFresh’s IPO and Google has done a Hollywood production number for tech inventor and actress Hedy Lamarr. #techFT is a new daily tech, media and telecoms newsletter, which you can sign up for hereRead more

638763b6-7819-11e5-a95a-27d368e1ddf7Welcome to #techFT, a new daily newsletter on technology, digital media and telecoms from the Financial Times that we’ve launched from the Web Summit in Dublin this week. Please send any feedback to techFT@ft.com and encourage friends and colleagues to sign up here . Also check out our Tech meets money Facebook page.

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638763b6-7819-11e5-a95a-27d368e1ddf7Welcome to #techFT, a new daily newsletter on technology, digital media and telecoms from the Financial Times that we’re launching from the Web Summit in Dublin this week. Please send any feedback to techFT@ft.com and encourage friends and colleagues to sign up here . Also check out our Tech meets money Facebook page.

 Read more

638763b6-7819-11e5-a95a-27d368e1ddf7Welcome to #techFT, a new daily newsletter on technology, digital media and telecoms from the Financial Times that we’re launching from the Web Summit in Dublin this week. Please send any feedback to techFT@ft.com and encourage friends and colleagues to sign up here

 Read more

638763b6-7819-11e5-a95a-27d368e1ddf7Welcome to #techFT, a new daily newsletter on technology, digital media and telecoms from the Financial Times that we’re launching from the Web Summit in Dublin this week. Please send any feedback to techFT@ft.com and encourage friends and colleagues to sign up here

 Read more

Welcome to #techFT, a new daily newsletter on technology, digital media and telecoms from the Financial Times that we’re launching from the Web Summit in Dublin this week. Please send any feedback to techFT@ft.com and encourage friends and colleagues to sign up here.

 Read more

Ten days can be a long time. There were the Ten Days that Shook the World in the Russian Revolution of 1917, the Ten Tragic Days during the Mexican Revolution of 1913, and: who can forget? The ten days where Kate Hudson tried to drive away Matthew McConaughey in the movie How to Lose a Guy in Ten Days.

Jack Dorsey has had an almost as eventful ten days, starting last Monday when he was appointed permanent chief executive of messaging platform Twitter, until this Wednesday, when his second start-up, Square, published its S1, confirming the payments company’s intention to go public. Read more

Apple is a company that thrives on surprises to promote its products. But it is actually a creature of habit, especially when it comes to launching its flagship device, the iPhone.

So when Apple deviates from the well-established patterns of years gone by, as it did on Monday, it stands out – raising questions from analysts about why. Read more


Twitter has had investors (and journalists) eagerly awaiting its appointment of a new chief executive for the two and a half months since Dick Costolo stepped down and co-founder and former chief exec Jack Dorsey took over as a caretaker leader.

Chris Sacca, an early Twitter investor who has long been the most outspoken shareholder on the company’s user growth troubles, is now calling for Dorsey to be made its permanent chief executive. Read more

Apple Unveils New Versions Of iPhone 6, Apple TV

Apple took over one of the largest venues in San Francisco for the launch of its latest iPhone on Wednesday.
Tim Cook, Apple’s chief executive, climbed on the stage of the Bill Graham Civic Auditorium to unveil an updated iPhone 6S with enhanced touchscreen capabilities, a better camera and a new “rose gold” finish. The new smartphone was upstaged by the long-awaited overhaul of Apple TV, with Siri voice control, a new remote and a full App Store, bringing iOS games to the living room for the first time. New Apple Watch features and a supersized iPad Pro made appearances too. Tim Bradshaw and Richard Waters covered the event. 

There’s a saying among consumer electronics start-ups: hardware is hard. Unlike a software or internet company, hardware start-ups have to worry about manufacturing, distribution and inventory, as well as all the working capital worries that go along with them. Read more

CHINA-ECONOMY-TRADE

Apple more than doubled its sales in China to nudge third-quarter revenues and earnings just ahead of market forecasts. But a shortfall in iPhone sales compared with Wall Street’s forecasts caused the stock to tumble by as much as 8 per cent after-hours on Tuesday. Revenues for the three months ending in June were up 33 per cent to $49.6bn with earnings up 45 per cent to $1.85 – the ninth consecutive quarter that Apple has beaten earnings forecasts. Sales of the iPhone rose 35 per cent to 47.5m units, below the 49m Wall Street was looking for, while Chinese revenues jumped 112 per cent to $13.2bn. Tim Bradshaw brings live reaction to Apple’s earnings and updates from its earnings call with chief executive Tim Cook.
 


former Twitter CEO Dick CostoloDick Costolo is out as chief executive of Twitter, and Jack Dorsey, one of the company’s co-founders, is in – at least on an interim basis.

Here’s how the news unfolded on the messaging platform on Thursday. Read more

It’s Apple turn to court the app makers, after Google and Microsoft held their developer conferences in recent weeks. This year’s Worldwide Developer Conference is expected to see the unveiling of Apple Music, its new subscription streaming service, following last year’s $3bn acquisition of Beats. There will also be changes to Watchkit, to improve apps for the Apple Watch, and potentially updates to Carplay, Homekit and its TV platform, alongside the usual annual refresh of iOS and Mac OSX.
Tim Bradshaw, Richard Waters and Matt Garrahan will provide live updates from the WWDC keynote at San Francisco’s Moscone Center. 

What have we learnt in this week’s experiment? Can we better understand how wearables might be used in workplaces by looking back at history? Just what did FT’s news editor, Alec Russell, make of Sarah’s wearables data? Does he want to roll it out across newsroom? Read more

What could go wrong? Many things, it turns out, when a company wants to use wearables to track its workers or measure its business. Employers have to be aware of potentials for people to game the system, how to ensure cybersecurity and legal compliance, and perhaps most importantly, how not to lose their workers’ trust. Read more

Even if employees are happy with their bosses’ using wearables to track their days – and possibly nights – they risk seeing that sensitive data fall into the hands of hackers.

Information on how employees spend their time could appeal to hacktivists
searching for potential embarrassments, cyber criminals looking to sell addresses online or rivals seeking an insight into possible M&A negotiations (who visits where) or trade secrets (who sources what where).

Kevin Mahaffey, co-founder and chief technology officer at mobile security start-up Lookout, said wearables will inevitably be attacked once they become more widespread.

Wearables are computers and all computers are hackable,” he said. Read more

Thousands of developers are gathering in San Francisco for Google I/O, one of the internet company’s biggest events of the year. Google is expected to reveal the latest updates to its Android smartphone operating system and Chrome web browser platform, as well as its extensions into wearable technology, TV sets, the “internet of things” and perhaps even virtual reality. Richard Waters and Tim Bradshaw are at the Moscone Center to bring live news and commentary from the keynote, which starts at 9.30am local time (5.30pm BST, 12.30pm EDT). 

Do employers want to track their staff with wearables, or is it too much information? Would managers even know how to make sense of, and use, the data collected? Read more

How would employees feel about being tracked by their bosses via wearables? Could some grow to value it if it helps them in their work? Read more