Tim Bradshaw

Apple is expected to unveil new iPads and Macs at a small event inside its Cupertino headquarters. But will it be enough to revive growth in a sluggish tablet market? Tim Bradshaw and Leslie Hook bring live updates from 1 Infinite Loop. 

Richard Milne

Angry Birds may be in free fall but two of the executives most responsible for its success are spreading their wings.

Just days after the company behind Angry Birds cut 16 per cent of its workforce amid disappointing growth, two former Rovio executives are launching their first game backed with $5m of venture capital money.

Andrew Stalbow, former head of strategic partnerships at Rovio and now chief executive at Seriously, said he hoped Thursday’s launch of Best Fiends would be the start of creating a mobile phone-centred entertainment brand. Read more

Tim Bradshaw

Apple has invited reporters to an event on October 16, which is expected to see the debut of new iPads and Mac computers. Read more

Sarah Mishkin

Start-up Product Hunt, not yet one year old, may be setting new records for fastest fundraisings and longest list of big name investors.

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Richard Waters

The announcement of a new Windows isn’t what it used to be – even when you skip past little-loved 9 (a number which didn’t test well with focus groups, apparently) and jump straight to Windows 10.

But converging the different Windows operating systems on a single core, with distinct user interfaces suited to each type of device, is still an important step forward for Microsoft. It also represents the sort of evolution that might, in time, allow the Windows 8 debacle to fade into history. Read more

Tim Bradshaw

Apple is making a big splash in Europe this week. On the same day the European Commission published the initial findings of its investigation into Ireland’s handling of its taxes, Apple popped up at Paris Fashion Week to show off its forthcoming Watch to the general public for the first time.

In a clear break with previous launches, Apple chose a chic fashion boutique, rather than its own retail stores, as the venue, giving a hint of how the smartwatch might be marketed and distributed when it goes on sale next year. Read more

Sarah Mishkin

One of the early investors in payment processing start-up Stripe is upping its investment. Not in the company itself, valued earlier this year at near $2bn, but in the ecosystem of other start-ups that is slowly coalescing around it.

General Catalyst, an early investor in Stripe, is putting up $10m fund to invest in start-ups that offer services, like analytics or other business analysis tools, tied to the company’s Stripe Connect platform. Read more

Google has mocked News Corp for this anti-EU headline in the Sun

Google has responded to criticism from Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp that it is dominant, anti-competitive and bad for media companies. So where are the key battle lines, and how convincing are Google’s arguments?

Point 1: How dominant is Google?

News Corp said: “[Google’s] power increases with each passing day”. Read more

Apple’s latest iPhone has been has been hailed as the thinnest and biggest mobile device it has created yet. But those qualities may have created an unexpected problem: the gadget may have a tendency to “bend”.

Lewis Hilsenteger of product review site Unbox Therapy has published a video that has gone viral (over 3m views and counting), in which he conducted a not-so-scientific “bend test” on the phone. Using his hands to apply pressure on the back of the device while pulling the edges back, he found that the device was warped.

“Will this happen in your front pocket?” asked Mr Hilsenteger. “That probably depends on how tight your pants are.”

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Richard Waters

Ray Ozzie, the man who once filled Bill Gates’ very big shoes as chief software architect at Microsoft, is back.

His latest start-up – a voice-powered collaboration tool for workers – looks like a not-so-subtle snub of his former employer. It is, he says, what Skype (now owned by Microsoft) might have become, had it not given up on “innovation in depth”. Read more

Tim Bradshaw

The virtual-reality creations on show at this weekend’s Oculus Connect event were as varied as they were bizarre.

Some 800 overwhelmingly male developers gathered at the upmarket Loews Hotel in Hollywood to attend presentations ranging from game design to “360-degree filmmaking”. A session dedicated to the Gear VR, Oculus’s collaboration with Samsung to launch a mobile VR headset later this year, was particularly busy.

Outside the talks, developers lined up to try Oculus’s new Crescent Bay prototype device and showed off their own VR software – just some of the 325 games uploaded to Oculus Share, its version of an app store. Read more

Tim Bradshaw

Oculus is closing in on the consumer release of its Rift virtual reality headset, accelerated by a huge hiring spree since its sale to Facebook in March.

It showed off its new ‘Crescent Bay’ prototype at the Oculus Connect developer conference in Los Angeles on Saturday. Read more

The stock market had never seen an IPO like it. At $25bn, assuming the expected high demand leads the underwriters to sell the maximum of shares available, Alibaba’s launch on the New York Stock Exchange on Friday looked set to be the biggest stock sale ever. Jack Ma, the Chinese ecommerce company’s charismatic founder, was on hand for the celebration at the New York Stock Exchange as China’s richest man became 38 per cent richer. FT reporters Sarah Mishkin, Hannah Kuchler, Eric Platt and Sujeet Indap reported it as it happened. 

Tim Bradshaw

After weeks of hype, Apple’s big day is finally here: the iPhone 6 goes on sale in the US, UK, Hong Kong and other key markets (though not China) on Friday.

As ever, the Apple faithful are lining up outside its stores, after supplies of its supersized iPhone 6 Plus were exhausted in online preorders within a matter of hours last week. Most analysts predict pent-up demand for upgrades will push iPhone sales to a new record.

“Big” is the operative word all round. Apple has lent the FT both of the new iPhones and, after an evening playing with both devices, one conclusion feels obvious: the iPhone 6 Plus is just too big. Read more

  © Photo: Getty

If Google Glass didn’t exist, guys in Silicon Valley would be having affairs or buying unsuitable motorbikes – or so claim the “White Men Wearing Google Glass” Tumblr and Twitter feeds, which mock the device’s associations with unfashionable male geekery.

Now Google’s flagship wearable is a step closer to shedding its unflattering image: high-end online fashion sites Net-a-Porter and Mr Porter have started selling Glass to UK shoppers, the first third-party retailers to do so. Read more

Tim Bradshaw

Don’t let anyone tell you that size doesn’t matter.

The first reviews are in for the latest iPhones and if there is one common obsession, it’s the undeniable fact that these are the largest iPhones Apple has ever made.

Here are a few highlights from reviewers’ first takes of the iPhone 6 and the supersized iPhone 6 Plus. (No sniggering at the back.) Read more

On Monday, the FT began publishing a three-day series about the growing international backlash against US technology companies.

The first part focused on how Silicon Valley has embarked on a charm offensive in the wake of growing concerns about their role in US government surveillance and how they use their customers’ data. Part two highlighted the situation in Germany, which is leading the European regulatory push-back against big US tech groups.

We included a survey with these stories asking readers how they have changed their online habits in the past year due to privacy concerns.

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Russian internet group Mail.ru has paid $1.47bn to acquire the 48 per cent of social media website VKontakte that it does not already own, ending a battle for ownership of Russia’s equivalent to Facebook. Read more

Sarah Mishkin

Payments start-up Square is raising at least $100m in a funding round that valued the group at $6bn, up from a $5bn valuation earlier this year, according to a new company filing.

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At a conference this April, Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook’s chief operating officer, got chatting to Cherie Blair, a lawyer and philanthropist who is the wife of former British prime minister Tony Blair.

Fast forward five months, and the pair are now unveiling Facebook’s first partnership to promote entrepreneurship, among women who run businesses in the developing world. “I think this is the way women work – we wanted to see if we could cooperate to use Facebook and its technology to help women,” Mrs Blair said in a conversation with the FT.

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