3D printing

China invented printing several centuries before Gutenberg’s mechanical press in Germany. Now a Chinese company in Shanghai appears to have stolen a march over Europe in the race to build the world’s first 3D printed house.

A Shanghai company, Shanghai WinSun Decoration Design Engineering Co, says it made 10 3D printed houses (see photos) each costing $4,800 each in less than 24 hours, according to 3ders, a 3D printing industry website.

 

The inventor of the 3D printed gun has trained his sights on Bitcoin, fronting a campaign to keep the virtual currency anonymous and beyond the reach of the authorities, writes Jane Wild.

Cody Wilson’s move hits back at efforts by the Bitcoin trade body, businesses and investors who have been working with officials mainly in the US to press for acceptance of virtual currencies and hasten their integration into mainstream financial systems. 

Robert Cookson

What does Bitcoin have in common with 3D printing, besides both being technologies loved by geeks? On the face of it, not much: one is a digital currency and the other allows you to reproduce almost any small, solid object in the world.

But as lawmakers are starting to realise, there is a key similarity: both Bitcoin and 3D printing have the potential to reduce the power of the state and put it into the hands of individuals.