3D

“From the lens to the living room” is how Sony describes its comprehensive  3D strategy internally, referring to its range from 3D professional cameras that cover sporting events and film movies for Sony Pictures to the TVs and PlayStation 3s in the living room that deliver games, films and other 3D entertainment to the viewer.

But how do consumers get their own personal 3D content from the lens of cameras such as Sony’s 3D Bloggie to TVs such as its top-of-the-range Bravia XBR-55HX929? – a feat I attempted in the latest Personal Technology column in the FT’s Business Life section. 

Chris Nuttall

“From the lens to the living room” is how Sony describes its comprehensive 3D coverage internally, referring to the 3D professional cameras that cover sporting events and film movies for Sony Pictures and the TVs and PlayStation 3s in the living room that deliver games, films and other entertainment to the viewer. But how do consumers get their own personal 3D content from the lens of cameras such as Sony’s 3D Bloggie to TVs such as its top-of-the-range Bravia XBR-55HX929, a feat I attempted in the latest Personal Technology column in the FT’s Business Life section. 

Chris Nuttall

Nintendo’s latest handheld console will cost more than the Wii home console when it goes on sale in the US and Europe in March.

At news conferences in New York and Amsterdam on Wednesday, the Japanese console maker revealed the 3DS will cost $250 in the US, with a retail price of around the same figure in euros expected in Europe and a UK price of #230. The Wii costs $200 (€190, £180). 

Chris Nuttall

On the eve of the unveiling of US launch details for the 3DS handheld console, the American Academy of Ophthalmology has been casting an eye over Nintendo’s 3D health warning. Reading between the eye-chart lines, the AAO appears to suggest the Japanese console maker is being a mite too cautious in suggesting parents should prevent children under six from viewing 3D images on the new device for prolonged periods. 

Joseph Menn

Hewlett-Packard is announcing an entertainment-oriented  refresh to its notebook computer line today–and the most notable addition comes with its own 3D glasses.

The HP Envy 17 3D’s glasses automatically turn on when the user is watching a 3D Blu-ray DVD on the machine and then turn off again, giving the glasses a projected year of battery life.

In a test, I found the background shapes to have distracting shadows, but HP said it is tweaking the technology and will ship before the winter holidays at $1,600 or more. 

Chris Nuttall

Nintendo’s 3D handheld console is the undoubted star of the E3 video game show here in Los Angeles this week, judging by the long lines of gamers at the Nintendo booth waiting to try one out.

While Apple has emerged as a new challenger, with the iPhone and iPod touch, to handheld consoles, the unique features of the 3DS look like giving Nintendo a significant and long-lasting advantage in mobile gaming. 

Chris Nuttall

In this week’s Digital Business supplement in the FT, the Valley View column looks at how the features of the latest displays are leaping out of the screen at us.

From 3D, to added yellow sub-pixels and wedge optics that project separate images from a display to different viewers,  the future will be seen through new prisms and paradigms. 

Chris Nuttall

Just to upstage all the other 3D TV announcements on Wednesday , Sony gave us a demonstration of dual 3D at its CES press conference.

Sir Howard Stringer, Sony chief executive, introduced his record label’s hottest artist Taylor Swift  and we all donned 3D glasses to watch her perform in real-life 3D against a 3D back projection of the broadcast of her and the band performing the song. 

Chris Nuttall

While many will be queuing at cinemas for a look at Avatar on Friday through RealD’s 3D glasses, the same experience is not that far away on living room TVs.

Los Angeles-based RealD, whose technology is the most widely used for 3D in the cinema, announced a partnership with Sony today that will bring it to Bravia LCD TVs next year. 

Chris Nuttall

Augmented reality is a many-rendered thing, a buzz phrase augmented itself by an expanding definition. Some technology applications don’t really seem to fit the description as they jump on the bandwagon.

Take Mattel’s announcement of “augmented-reality technology” being included in its toys at this week’s Comic-Con show in San Diego