Arm

Arm shares are being treated like royalty today, despite being disdained as commoners at the open. 

Chris Nuttall

Intel has launched its first Atom processor for data centres, defending its high-margin server business from oncoming attacks by cheaper, low-powered chips based on designs of the UK’s Arm.

The Atom S1200 (pictured) product family, formerly codenamed Centerton, consumes just 6 watts of power, compared to the 45 watts drawn by Intel’s high-performance Xeon processors that are traditionally used in data centres. 

Maija Palmer

Warren East, chief executive of Arm Holdings, sees an opportunity for UK technology companies as rising development costs are forcing the structure of the semiconductor chip industry to change.  In our video interview, he also explains to FT technology correspondent Maija Palmer how the internet of things like intelligent fridges or medical devices will lead to more efficient energy use and better healthcare. 

Richard Waters

It’s the weekend. What better time to pour a glass of wine, put your feet up and settle back with… a 9,000-word blog post about the future of Windows?

Not this post (which comes in at a mere 300 words) – this one, from Steven Sinofsky, which lays out Microsoft’s plans for bringing Windows to ARM-based mobile devices. But don’t worry: there’s no reason to read the whole thing to see why it’s got Microsoft-watchers buzzing. 

Tech news from around the web:

Since its integration with Facebook, MOG, the music streaming service, has reached 160,000 monthly average users, a 264 percent growth for the month of October, Venture Beat reports.

Apple is planning to update its retail store to allow customers to buy items through an app, BGR reports. The update is supposed to start on November 3rd. 

Laptops are becoming interesting for Arm again, admits its president Tudor Brown, despite the bevy of increasingly powerful Arm-based tablet models shown at this year’s Computex. 

Chris Nuttall

Intel is predicting a reinvention over the next two years of the consumer PC – a core market for the world’s biggest chipmaker – as it battles competition from smartphones and tablets.
Speaking at the company’s analyst meeting on Tuesday, Paul Otellini, chief executive, said that the PC would become a higher performance mainstream-priced, touch-enabled device that would not compromise on features such as thinness, instant-on capabilities, permanent internet connectivity and all-day battery life. 

Tech news from around the web:

  • Twitter is set to more than triple its advertising revenue to $150m this year as more companies use it to spread marketing messages, according to Bloomberg, with ad sales set to hit $250m by 2012.
  • In a move that could let its users avoid having their online actions monitored, Mozilla Corp is planning to add a “do-not-track” feature to its Firefox browser, the Wall Street Journal reports. The announcement would make Firefox the first Web browser to heed the Federal Trade Commission’s call for the development of a do-not-track system.

 

Chris Nuttall

Intel will make inroads into the tablet and smartphone markets in 2011 and their growth will drive increased sales of it server chips. That was the defiant win-win message from Paul Otellini, chief executive, on Thursday as he responded to concerns that the world’s biggest chipmaker was missing out on the next big wave for consumer technologies. 

From FT Alphaville’s Markets Live on Arm Holdings