big data

Richard Waters

Step into the San Francisco offices of Climate Corporation, and the first thing you see is a giant suspended globe. It is a dramatic representation of the power of big data: cloud formations move across it in real time, attesting to the level of detail with which the company captures and models weather information.

Now, with Climate Corp’s sale to Monsanto for an up-front payment of $930m (with more cash set aside for staff retention), the big data business has its first significant acquisition, and an important vindication for those who argue that data analytics is becoming a competitive differentiator. 

Sailthru, a start up that is trying to make “smart data” out of “big data,” has raised $19m in a Series B investment round led by Benchmark Capital.

This is the second investment to close in as many days for Benchmark, which led a $13.5m Series A fundraising round for Snapchat, the ephemeral social networking service that lets people post photos or messages that self-delete after 10 seconds or less. That company is valued between $60m and $70m. 

With many major events these days, record-breaking levels of engagement on social media sites such as Twitter and Facebook are customary, and this week’s presidential election was no exception.

After his re-election was announced, a photo of President Barack Obama hugging his wife that was posted on Twitter and Facebook became the most liked and most popular tweet of all time. But others argued big data might have been the real winner of this year’s presidential election.