David Cameron

Tim Bradshaw

David Cameron, the British prime minister, returned to Shoreditch in East London on Thursday to mark the first anniversary of his Tech City initiative

Tim Bradshaw

The British government appears to have shelved plans to block rioting teens from using Facebook and Twitter or even shutting down Research in Motion’s BlackBerry Messenger network during times of crisis, in response to this month’s violent disorder.

After much wailing and gnashing of teeth at the idea, Thursday’s meeting between the three technology companies and the Home Secretary passed calmly and without incident. 

Tim Bradshaw

Facebook, Twitter and BlackBerry-maker Research in Motion have made quite different responses to the prime minister’s call for them to play a greater role in preventing future riots on the British streets.

The three technology companies have been summoned before the home secretary to discuss a mooted scheme to block conspiring rioters

Tim Bradshaw

David Cameron, the British prime minister, has said that the authorities should consider blocking individuals’ access to social media if they are plotting violent acts, in the wake of the week’s riots and looting

Tim Bradshaw

Last time Facebook met a UK government minister, it was enduring tabloid hell after a 17-year-old girl was murdered by a man she met through the social network.

Today saw what seems to have been a much more amicable meeting.

Mark Zuckerberg, who began his trip to Europe yesterday at a London Facebook “hackathon”, this morning met with David Cameron, the prime minister, and Jeremy Hunt, secretary of state for culture and media.