galaxy

As New York braces itself for Samsung’s heavily hyped launch of its latest Galaxy smartphone, complete with coverage on giant screens in Times Square, the choice of venue reflects the company’s conviction that it has gained the upper hand in its battle with Apple, writes Simon Mundy.

In 2010, with Apple still dominant in the smartphone market, the first Galaxy handset was launched at a modest event in Singapore. A year later, at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Samsung unveiled the second in the series; by May 2012, it was confident enough to launch the Galaxy SIII at a high-profile standalone event in London. Now, as Thursday’s New York launch demonstrates, Samsung is going all out to attack Apple’s grip on its home US market. 

Tim Bradshaw

Samsung’s latest flagship Galaxy smartphone looks set to be unveiled on March 14, according to the company’s postings on Twitter and Facebook, as the Korean giant prepares its latest volley against Apple’s iPhone.

A flyer for the launch event, held in New York and livestreamed on YouTube, invites fans to “come and meet the next Galaxy”, expected to be the S4. The device will be the follow-up to its best-selling Galaxy S3 and is rumoured to include a larger, 5-inch display with full-HD, 1080p resolution. 

Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1

Samsung’s Galaxy Note 10.1 tablet went on sale on Thursday, with an emphasis on challenging the iPad by focusing on creative possibilities that are enhanced by its pen. Sony’s updated Reader, also just launched, has the simpler aim of immersing you in a digital book and it feels lighter than most paperbacks.

 

The next move in the race for dominance of the lucrative smartphone market has been made by Samsung, after the Korean electronics group unveiled the latest incarnation of its best-selling Galaxy range in London.

The Galaxy SIII comes with a host of innovations and gimmicks – such as multitasking functions and a high definition screen – that Samsung will hope will be enough to take further customers away from the dominant iPhone range made by Apple. 

Joseph Menn

Apple has lost a bid to stop Samsung imports of its Galaxy Tab and some smartphones in the US, keeping the waters cloudy in one of the most important legal battles between the two tech titans. 

Chris Nuttall

Staggering fact of the week for me was the news at the Google music launch that the number of Android devices has doubled in the past six months – from 100m activated to 200m.

Add another one to that total. I have just registered the latest and greatest Android smartphone – the Samsung Galaxy Nexus – the first to feature the new Ice Cream Sandwich 4.0 version of Android. 

Tech news from around the web:

  • Google is working on an overhaul of YouTube to take advantage of the WebTV explosion, the Wall Street Journal reports.  The online company is also planning to spend as much as $100m to commission low-cost content designed exclusively for the web.  Meanwhile, The Hollywood Reporter says that Google is planning to open an office in Beverly Hills.

 

Tech news from around the web:

  • AllThingsDigital reports that Rob Solomon, the president and chief operating officer of group buying site Groupon, is stepping down from his job. No reasons have been given for the former Yahoo executive’s departure.

 

Chris Nuttall

One of the things noted in my review last week of the Samsung Galaxy Tab was the inferior screen compared to the iPad and Samsung’s own Super Amoled Galaxy smartphones.

Well, it looks like Samsung already has plans to fix that with the unveiling of a second-generation Tab with Amoled screen in Japan this week, although it’s unlikely to appear before the second half of next year. 

Tim Bradshaw

There are two ways one could think about Samsung’s new Galaxy Tab.

One would be to look at its slick casing, its compact 7-inch form, the latest Android software and extensive 3G support from European mobile operators, and say: here is a device which proves the iPad isn’t the only show in town.

The other would be to look at its slick casing, its compact 7-inch form, the latest Android software and extensive 3G support from European mobile operators, and say: isn’t this just an oversized smartphone?