iCloud

Barely two months after Apple admitted it was storing users’ data online in mainland China, reports emerged that hackers have tried breaking into its iCloud data.

Apple representatives in China declined to comment on the reports of the hacking attack, which were posted on GreatFire.org, a group that conducts research on Chinese internet censorship.

The revelations, if true, would be little surprise to China observers. But it would be a comeuppance for Apple whose decision to store users’ data in mainland servers underlined the tenuous balance that foreign tech companies must strike between commitment to customer security and the realities of the Chinese market. 

Tim Bradshaw

Dropbox chief executive Drew Houston didn’t mention iCloud once during his presentation at the cloud storage company’s first ever developer conference on Tuesday. But as Dropbox rolls out its new platform tools – allowing apps to synchronise not just files and folders but progress in games, realtime sketches or any other kind of data from one device to another – it’s clear that Apple was the unnamed competitor that Mr Houston has to take on. 

Tech news from around the web:

Best Buy and Best Buy Mobile stores in the US are poised to take pre-orders for Apple’s iPhone 5 starting this week with the handset arriving in the first week of October, according to BGR. US mobile group Sprint will be carrying the iPhone 5 at launch. 9to5Mac, meanwhile, reports that Apple has begun iOS5 and iCloud training at its retail stores to coincide with the iPhone5′s unveiling. 

Every year, Apple’s Worldwide Developer Conference turns into “Apple week”. The tech world holds its collective breath for the company’s latest list of announcements.

But this year had an extra twist: a spaceship spotted in Cupertino.

 

Richard Waters

There’s always a danger, when a company like Apple comes up with a sweeping move like the iCloud, of viewing it in isolation. But the responses from Apple’s rivals will be rapid.

That, of course, is exactly why Steve Jobs has just tried to stake out the territory in his own inimitable way, months before Apple is actually in a position to launch a service. Sound familiar? It’s the same game plan that Microsoft followed for so many years.