instagram

Hannah Kuchler

Instagram takes pride in being more than just a corner of Facebook. The pretty photo-sharing app that Facebook bought in 2012 has maintained much of its independence while picking and choosing from the strategies that have served Facebook well.

Now, with the launch of super-fast video app Hyperlapse, it is becoming clear that Instagram will follow in Facebook’s lead and create its own suite of apps, or as it is becoming known in social media world, a multi-app strategy. 

Hannah Kuchler

The first advert on Instagram, the social photo app owned by Facebook, was published on Friday to a chorus of complaints from users. 

Tim Bradshaw

Many thought that Instagram’s addition of 15-second videos to its photo-sharing app would kill Vine, Twitter’s fledgling video app.

Apparently not.

Twitter on Tuesday said that 40m people have signed up to watch and share six-second videos on Vine. 

Tim Bradshaw

Kevin Systrom, Instagram’s founder, didn’t mention Vine at all when he unveiled his photo-sharing app’s new video function. But he wasn’t exactly subtle about pointing out the places where Instagram differs from Twitter’s 6-second video app. Here’s a quick rundown and some first impressions of how the two apps stack up: 

AFP

Interesting commentary from around the Web on a tech story that made headlines last week.

Users of Instagram and Twitter were caught in the middle of a photo turf war this week. Instagram’s announcement that it would no longer allow its photos to appear in Twitter feeds raised concerns over whether web companies are holding user content hostage as they try to monetise their platforms. 

Flooding in New York

A monumental presidential election in 2008, social revolutions in the Middle East last year, and now Hurricane Sandy.

Photos of water lapping at the base of the Brooklyn carousel and spindly trees crashed upon car roofs have, er, flooded social media channels.

Just as Facebook burst into the mainstream during Barack Obama’s first presidential election campaign, today Instagram, the photo-sharing app now owned by Facebook, is finding widespread use as the preferred storytelling medium of the biggest storm in decades to hit the east coast. 

Tim Bradshaw

Twitter has been touting its success as a “mobile first” social network, capitalising on the biggest perceived weakness of its main rival Facebook.

One recent estimate from eMarketer has even suggested that Twitter will generate more revenues from mobile ads than Facebook this year.

But new data show the scale of the threat that Twitter faces from explosive growth at Instagram, the photo-sharing app acquired by Facebook. 

Tim Bradshaw

Instagram’s future lies in extracting more value for users from all the photos they have uploaded in the past, founder Kevin Systrom told London’s Le Web event on Tuesday.

“We have all this data we want to let you explore,” he told host Loic LeMeur. “It’s not just about creation, it’s about exploration. That’s what we’re going to be most active in.” 

Pinterest

Today’s hottest internet services all involve pictures. Draw Something attracted 15m users in its first six weeks before the game was bought for $200m by Zynga, Pinterest has rapidly become the third-most popular US social network and Facebook is paying $1bn for Instagram. This week, snapshots of three picture-taking services.

 

Fresh off its release on Android, Instagram, the photo sharing app, was snatched up by Facebook for a reported $1bn in cash and stock on Monday. The blogosphere was buzzing with part shock, part disgust. But above all, the deal was seen as an indicator of how concerned Mark Zuckerberg is about Facebook’s weakness in moving into the mobile world.