intel

Sounds like a bad week for Moore’s Law at the microchip industry’s big annual Silicon Valley get-together. Read more

It was a skunkworks project that whiffed for Intel’s incoming chief executive.

Now the world’s biggest chipmaker has announced the sale of its nascent internet TV service to the communications-provider-with-big-TV-ambitions Verizon. Read more

Richard Waters

John McAfee has his name back. The controversial anti-virus software entrepreneur had been sharing it with Intel since 2011. But after his bizarre exploits in Belize became prime tabloid fodder more than a year ago, it seemed only a matter of time before the association went the way of history. Read more

Chris Nuttall

Intel has unveiled the capabilities of a power-frugal Atom processor it says will make it more competitive in not just smartphones and tablets, but also in microservers and other market segments, including in-car entertainment.

Codenamed Silvermont, the new chip offers three times more peak performance than the previous Atom generation or five times lower power demands at the same performance, according to the company. It will debut on 22 nanometres – a circuit width that the rest of the industry has not matched thus far – and Intel will extend its efficiencies with a move to 14nm next year. Read more

The six-month search is over. Intel’s board has picked Brian Krzanich, current chief operating officer, as the chip maker’s new chief executive, replacing Paul Otellini who left Intel after 8 years, Reuters has reported.

As Chris Nuttall wrote at the time of Mr Otellini’s exit, Mr Krzanich was an early favourite for the top job. He was promoted to chief operating officer in January last year, a role occupied by Craig Barrett, Mr Otellini’s predecessor, before he took the top job. As executive vice-president, Mr Krzanich already occupied the most senior role below the chief executive. Read more

Chris Nuttall

Intel has unveiled new Atom processors for tablets and smartphones at International CES as it tries to make inroads in a market dominated by its rivals’ ARM-based chips.

The world’s biggest chipmaker also introduced its fourth-generation Core processor, codenamed Haswell, which it promises will finally deliver all-day battery life for laptops. New table PCs were also being featured (pictured) and advances in “perceptual” computing.

We were at Intel’s news conference and our as-it-happened report is after the jump. Read more

Chris Nuttall

Intel has launched its first Atom processor for data centres, defending its high-margin server business from oncoming attacks by cheaper, low-powered chips based on designs of the UK’s Arm.

The Atom S1200 (pictured) product family, formerly codenamed Centerton, consumes just 6 watts of power, compared to the 45 watts drawn by Intel’s high-performance Xeon processors that are traditionally used in data centres. Read more

When your company has been built around a deeply ingrained product development and manufacturing process, it is hard to change. And when that process has given you a world-beating edge through any number of product and technology cycles, it is even less easy to see why you should.

Now add in another complication: Wall Street thinks you have traded away your future and you need to learn a whole new way of doing business. But there is a catch. It does not want you to give up the unrepeatable profit margins you make from your old ways.

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Chris Nuttall

Ultrabooks are not coming to the rescue of the PC industry in this “post-PC” world, according to the latest forecasts from IHS iSuppli.

The research firm on Monday slashed its prediction for global shipments this year by more than half, from 22m to 10.3m. It estimated they would rise to 44m in 2013, but that is down from its earlier outlook of 61m. Read more

Chris Nuttall

Intel has introduced the low-power Atom processor – codenamed Clover Trail – that carries its hopes of making a dent in the tablet market when Windows 8 launches on October 26.

But first, the chipmaker had to carry out a damage-limitation exercise at the launch event in San Francisco on Thursday, clearing up remarks reportedly made at a private company meeting in Taiwan by Paul Otellini, chief executive, that Windows 8 was still buggy and not ready. Read more