intel

Chris Nuttall

Intel is betting on cheaper Ultrabooks, new convertible laptop/tablets and powerful voice, gesture and facial recognition features to maintain its market share in mobile computing, where it has been losing out to rivals’ chips powering smartphones and tablets.

That was the main message from the annual Intel Developer Forum, which began in San Francisco on Tuesday. Intel executives hope convertibles can create a category for the next 10 years and say they will be boosted by an as-yet-unnamed chip next year that will draw only 10 watts of power and give true all-day battery life. Read more >>

Chris Nuttall

Intel will give developers something to shout about, wave their hands in the air and roll their eyes at its annual conference for them next week. More mundanely, but just as important, it is expected to unveil details of its fourth-generation Core processors, including a new line of ultra-low voltage processors drawing just 10 watts of power.

A keynote speech by Dadi Perlmutter, Intel executive vice president, will suggest ways these new processors will be put to work with Ultrabooks, new tablet/laptop hybrids and with “perceptual computing” – Intel’s term for the use of voice commands, gestures and eye-tracking to control PCs – the next advances after the touch features being introduced with Windows 8 next month. Read more >>

Chris Nuttall

Just in time for the big computer show of the year – Computex in Taiwan next week – Microsoft is announcing a new version of Windows 8 and its longtime partner Intel has launched new versions of its latest Ivy Bridge-codenamed Core processors.

Both seem certain to be featured in new Ultrabooks later this year, although models unveiled at Computex will still feature Windows 7 and be Windows 8-ready, judging by briefings by PC manufacturers ahead of the show. Read more >>

Chris Nuttall

Intel told its investor day last week it would be producing 2m units a week of its latest “Ivy Bridge” processors by the end of June, but the chipmaker faces fresh competition from Tuesday’s consumer and business announcements by rivals AMD and Nvidia.

AMD launched its second-generation “Trinity” processors, touting longer battery life and lower prices than Intel’s offerings for notebooks and PCs, while Nvidia threatened to challenge Intel in the data centre and enterprise with the unveiling of its VGX graphics processing unit (GPU) platformRead more >>

Chris Nuttall

Intel told its “Ivy Bridge” launch event in San Francisco on Monday it had  more than 670 PC systems lined up to use this third-generation Core processor family.

That’s an unprecedented number of design wins for the world’s biggest chipmaker. It signifies that either this is one hot processor, or lengthy delays to it have created pent-up demand, or maybe the PC industry is gearing up for a big year, with Windows 8 launching. It could be all three, or something else, but Intel stuck to the silicon’s merits in its presentation. Read more >>

Chris Nuttall

Intel has launched its next-generation server processor to boost its presence in data centres and cloud storage, while at the same time pooh-poohing an acquisition by rival Advanced Micro Devices in the same area.

At a launch event in San Francisco on Tuesday, Intel said the Xeon E5  product family represented up to an 80 per cent performance improvement over its previous generation. It said it was not impressed with the server technology of SeaMicro and declined to buy it before AMD announced a $334m deal last week. Read more >>

Sean Maloney asks the question that is on my mind before I get to ask it. “Do you think I’m better or that I’m not better?” he inquires, barely 15 minutes into our conversation.

In his case, it is not such an odd question. Two years ago, he did not even know if he would talk again after suffering a stroke. He had been running with his 20-year-old son, then sat on the bed in his San Francisco home and everything went blank. “When I woke up there was nothing. It was terrible, waking up like that and asking what was I doing with my life,” he recalls.

By then, the London-born Mr Maloney was widely seen as the heir apparent to Paul Otellini, Intel’s chief executive, who is due to step down in 2015. Mr Maloney had risen rapidly through the ranks at the company since joining in 1982 – but the stroke called his inexorable ascent into question. “It almost killed me,” he says. Read more >>

Chris Nuttall

Intel has announced a management reshuffle that provides fresh clues to the eventual successor to Paul Otellini as chief executive.

Brian Krzanich, (pictured left), head of manufacturing, is also taking on a chief operating officer role – a position that has not existed since Mr Otellini held it prior to becoming CEO in 2005. Read more >>

Tech news from around the web:

Ilya Zhitomirskiy, one of the co-founders of social network Diaspora, has died at the age of 22, TechCrunch reports. Started by four students at New York University, Diaspora is an open-source social network and was set up as an alternative to companies such as Facebook. Read more >>

Chris Nuttall

Intel and Toyota are getting behind the wheel together to carry out research on next-generation “in-vehicle infotainment systems”.

It all sounds very vague at this stage and executives at a media briefing on Thursday could not provide any date for when an Intel Atom microprocessor might power such systems in Toyota cars. But the deal represents a big-name partnership for Intel in an industry it still views as a new market for Atom and where it needs such breakthroughs. Read more >>