Lenovo

Acer and its former chief executive Gianfranco Lanci may have parted ways for almost a year now, but it is apparently not quite water under the bridge between the two sides.

The Taiwanese company said on Tuesday that it has initiated legal action in Mr Lanci’s home country of Italy, alleging that Mr Lanci violated non-compete clauses in the contract he signed with Acer upon leaving in Febuary 2011 – Mr Lanci joined Lenovo as a consultant in September, and the Chinese company last month announced Mr Lanci would head its Europe, Middle East and Africa operations, effective April. Read more

Joseph Menn

Smack in the middle of the ultrabook and tablet hoopla from the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas comes a sobering report from the market researchers at IDC: PC shipments in the critical fourth quarter were down 0.2 per cent from a year before. Read more

When Acer last March unceremoniously ousted its then-chief executive Gianfranco Lanci, it was not an amicable parting, with both sides apportioning blame on the other for the split.

But if the Taiwanese company had thought they were rid of Mr Lanci by forcing his resignation, then they are sorely mistaken. Mr Lanci was this week appointed the head of Europe, Middle East and Africa by none other Lenovo, Acer’s Chinese rival. Read more

Apple iPad and iPhone 

 

If 2010 was Apple’s year in personal technology, with the launch of the iPad and major redesigns for the iPhone, MacBook Air and Apple TV, it is harder to call the winners of 2011, with Apple happy with incremental updates and the competition still striving to catch up.

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Maija Palmer

Milko van DuijlStill high on overtaking Dell last week to become the world’s second largest PC manufacturer by sales, Lenovo is becoming ever more bullish. Milko van Duijl, Lenovo’s senior vice president, is now not shy of admitting the company is gunning for the number one position – which it could reach within two or three years. Read more

lenovo ideapad

To judge how tastes and fashions can change, I placed our four-year-old family laptop, an Acer Aspire, next to the latest version, launched this week, the S3.

Acer had subcontracted the design of our old Aspire to BMW and it had a glossy black exterior curved like a bonnet, while its lid opened and shut with the solidity of a German car door.

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Chris Nuttall

The MacBook Air finally has some serious competition with the first of the new Ultrabook laptops being launched here at the IFA consumer electronics show in Berlin.

After Toshiba unveiled what it claimed was the world’s thinnest and lightest 13.3in laptop on Thursday – the Portege Z830 - Acer followed up on Friday with the Aspire S3, which boasts 1.5 seconds start-up time from a sleep state that can last 50 days on its long-life battery. Read more

Lenovo has announced its first family of tablets, with two being launched under the IdeaPad brand along with a ThinkPad tablet that uses Google’s Android 3.1 operating system.

Lenovo had recently released LePad, a 10in Android tablet that can dock with a laptop base, in China only, but rumours of these new tablets for the US had been rife for months and the ThinkPad version (pictured) looked the most interesting of the three when I was shown them recently.

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Chris Nuttall

Lenovo has announced its first family of tablets, with two being launched under the IdeaPad brand along with a ThinkPad tablet that uses Google’s Android 3.1 operating system. Lenovo had recently released LePad, a 10in Android tablet that can dock with a laptop base, in China only, but rumours of these new tablets for the US had been rife for months and the ThinkPad version looked the most interesting of the three when I was shown them recently. Read more

Chris Nuttall

At work, I have substituted the box under my desk, the one I keep accidentally kicking, with a Lenovo ThinkCentre Edge 91z all-in-one PC that sits on the desk in front of me. It has just one cable – for power. The PC‘s innards have been incorporated into the rear of the monitor, so no monitor cable is needed; the keyboard and mouse are connected by wireless and the built-in WiFi means no ethernet networking cable is needed. The iMac has the same capabilities, making these two devices the Mac and PC state-of-the-art ap­proaches to compact desktop computing. Read more