Berlin has scored a victory over London in the battle to be the main hub for Europe’s start-up companies after Seedcamp split its flagship event of Europe’s largest support programme for fledgling tech businesses between the two cities.

The incubator programme, which began life with a week-long event at London’s Imperial College in September 2007, will now hold four such gatherings in the UK and German capitals. Read more

Maija Palmer

After the excitement of Facebook’s $104bn IPO and the subsequent fall in its shares, something more modest is coming onto London’s alternative investment market.

Incadea, an Austrian company that provides software for BMW and other car dealerships, will raise around £17m on Friday, in a stock market float expected to value the company at £47m.

It’s a lot smaller than Facebook, but it is a rare technology listing in London, where the tech IPO market has been considered closed for a long time.  Read more

Maija Palmer

London’s Tech City project got a big boost on Thursday when Google officially opened Campus,  its first hub offering start-up technology companies desk space and mentoring.

Opened to great fanfare by George Osborne, chancellor, the seven-storey building will house 100 start-up companies and organisations such as Seedcamp, the technology incubator, and TechHub, the original provider of co-working space in the Shoreditch area. Read more

Technology companies are fast taking up some of the slack in the London property market created by the downsizing of the financial services sector.

IT, telecoms and internet start-up companies doubled their uptake of office space in central London during 2011. In total, the industry took up 1.3m square feet of office space in 2011, compared with 640,000 square feet in 2010, according to data from Knight Frank.

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Tim Bradshaw

Time Out, the entertainment reviews and listings group, has acquired Keynoir, a London daily-deals service, for a sum well below its inspiration Groupon’s multi-billion-dollar valuationRead more

Tim Bradshaw

David Cameron, the British prime minister, returned to Shoreditch in East London on Thursday to mark the first anniversary of his Tech City initiativeRead more

Tim Bradshaw

It might be the most significant meeting of British royals and geeks since Sir Tim Berners-Lee, creator of the web, received his knighthood in 2003.

Thursday evening saw a reception celebrating “innovation through UK entrepreneurship” held at Buckingham Palace, as the great and the good of London’s Silicon Roundabout and beyond gathered to toast digital Britain. Read more

Tim Bradshaw

The British government appears to have shelved plans to block rioting teens from using Facebook and Twitter or even shutting down Research in Motion’s BlackBerry Messenger network during times of crisis, in response to this month’s violent disorder.

After much wailing and gnashing of teeth at the idea, Thursday’s meeting between the three technology companies and the Home Secretary passed calmly and without incident. Read more

Tim Bradshaw

The British brouhaha surrounding the mass online breach of so-called “super injunctions” will not deter Twitter from opening a new office in London. In fact, it looks as though its first UK-based employee is Tony Wang, who moved over from San Francisco this very weekend.

But it remains unclear whether Twitter will join the start-ups on Silicon Roundabout or follow Google and Facebook to Soho. Read more

Tim Bradshaw

One of the biggest challenges facing any tech start-up, particularly in the UK, is recruiting skilled developers.

Rather than sit around waiting for the government’s East London Tech City initiative to bear more fruit than ministerial meet-and-greets, the residents of Shoreditch’s “Silicon Roundabout” are taking matters into their own hands. And yes, it involves a hilariously bad play on words. Read more

Tim Bradshaw

A little bit of Foursquare history was made in London last night. The UK’s first “super swarm” badge was awarded to more than 300 users of the location game. They all checked into the Jewel Bar in Piccadilly, with no other goal than to win the badge. Read more

Tim Bradshaw

The motivating force behind Seedcamp – the early stage tech investor and events programme that got underway today in London – is to bolster the European technology community.

Alongside better-known deals like AOL-Bebo and Ebay-Skype, the $700m sale of internet security firm MessageLabs to Symantec in 2008 is one of Europe’s biggest recent exits, and its two founders were on hand to share their experiences. Read more

Tim Bradshaw

This summer has seen some interesting blog posts from the venture capital community on the “rise of the super angels” – seasoned entrepreneurs who’ve cashed out and are reinvesting in the next generation.

Seedcamp, the European investor and events programme, is a big part of that story. Next week will see the fourth Seedcamp week in London, with 23 young companies jostling for up to €50,000 in investment and expert mentoring in what’s been dubbed the “X Factor for startups”.

But the increasingly active angel community means that Seedcamp has found itself facing competition too. Read more

Tim Bradshaw

Last time Facebook met a UK government minister, it was enduring tabloid hell after a 17-year-old girl was murdered by a man she met through the social network.

Today saw what seems to have been a much more amicable meeting.

Mark Zuckerberg, who began his trip to Europe yesterday at a London Facebook “hackathon”, this morning met with David Cameron, the prime minister, and Jeremy Hunt, secretary of state for culture and media. Read more

Tim Bradshaw

Who needs another shiny rectangle in their lives?

Plenty of people, if the queues outside Apple stores worldwide was anything to go by.

I was at Apple‘s London flagship shop on Regent Street this morning to ask people why they’d waited for hours to splash upwards of £429 on an iPad: Read more

Maija Palmer

Atlas VentureThe London technology community was dealt a blow on Tuesday when it emerged that Atlas Venture was planning to move its European operations to Boston. All new European investments will be co-ordinated from there, and Fred Destin, the London-based partner who has backed companies like Seatwave and Dailymotion, will be moving across the Atlantic this summer.

Other London-based partners, Christopher Spray, Graham O’Keefe and Regina Hodits will remain in London but only to service existing investments. They will not be involved in bringing new companies in to the portfolio. Which means that, as exits eventually arrive for the likes of Seatwave, these portfolio managers will have less of a role, and Atlas is likely to be slimming down further. Read more

Tim Bradshaw

silicon roundabout, innit

Move over Silicon Valley. New York’s Silicon Alley is a Web 1.0 relic. And Cambridge’s Silicon Fen is just SO pre-crunch. Now Silicon Roundabout is staking its claim as the new tech start-up hub of the moment. Read more