Mark Hurd

Richard Waters

Eighteen months after landing like a bombshell on the desk of HP’s then-CEO, the letter alleging sexual harassment against Mark Hurd has finally seen the light of day. But, for HP’s long-suffering shareholders, this will do little to answer what remains the most important question: Was the company’s board right to force out its highly-regarded CEO? 

Joseph Menn

In the latest salvo in a continuing battle between former allies, Hewlett-Packard on Wednesday filed suit against Oracle over the latter’s announced refusal in March to keep making new versions of its database software for HP servers based on the Itanium chip. But it is hard to know whether the case has much hope. 

From John Gapper’s Business Blog

As the ousting of Mark Hurd as chief executive of Hewlett-Packard starts to fade from the headlines, one aspect of it lingers in my mind – the Google search. 

Richard Waters

Given the questions that have arisen over the extent of his ethical lapses – and the fact that he was cleared of the most most serious claim against him, involving sexual harassment – it’s not surprising that Mark Hurd’s supporters are starting to come forward.

Oracle CEO Larry Ellison just unburdened himself of a typically outspoken reaction in an email to The New York Times. It includes this zinger: 

  • After more than 40 years, a first from Intel: the leading semiconductor company announced that it would outsource the manufacturing of some of its chips. The unprecedented agreement with Taiwan’s TSMC shows how Intel is adjusting its manufacturing and business model as the Atom processor starts to play a bigger part in its future. While the US company will still make the low-cost chips for netbook computers itself, it said that TSMC’s relationships with device makers would help the technology find its way into a much wider range of smartphones and other gadgets.