media

The BBC thinks its iPlayer service is “the best online television service in the world” – a platform so good that it’s the envy of Silicon Valley. So will Apple and Google be impressed by the platform’s latest redesign, unveiled in London on Tuesday?

This is a crucial time for the iPlayer: it will soon become the only home of BBC Three, the off-beat channel which is being taken off air to save costs. Tony Hall, the BBC’s director-general, wants the platform to be the “front door” to all the broadcaster’s content.

So what’s on offer in the new version? 

Tim Bradshaw

The iPad era has already held more than a few twists for news publishers: hailed as the saviour of newspapers, media owners then fell out with Apple over changes to its terms of service, only to fall back in love in time for this month’s release of its Newsstand application.

But where has all this wrangling left consumers? A timely survey by the Pew Research Center, in collaboration with the Economist Group, finds that for more than half of US tablet owners, skimming headlines or settling down for longer reads is central to their daily routine. Willingness to pay for news remains stubbornly similar to the regular web, while apps – the main mechanism for charging – are still less popular than the browser.