move

Chris Nuttall

Microsoft appears to be on track to fulfil its prediction of 5m Kinect sales by the end of the year, with its latest update revealing more than 2.5m motion controllers have been sold since its launch 25 days ago.

UPDATE: Sony has followed up with a report of “incredible demand” and sales of 4.1m units of its Move motion  controller since launch in mid-September. 

Chris Nuttall

Waving at our televisions is replacing button pushing with the new motion controllers for games consoles from Microsoft and Sony.

The Kinect, launched in Europe this week, and Sony’s Move are inspired by the Wii, but what do they offer that’s better or different from Nintendo’s big success? – a question I sought to answer in the Personal Technology column in the FT’s Business Life section this week. 

Chris Nuttall

Sony has every right to feel sore that Nintendo and Microsoft have stolen the limelight from it in adding motion-sensing to games.

Sony had the EyeToy  camera for sensing motion and putting players inside games on the PlayStation 2, long before Microsoft’s forthcoming Project Natal . Its six-axis controller has always had more motion capabilities than the three-axis Wii Remote.

But Sony has failed to market its motion technology to maximum effect and its launch of its Move motion controller for the PlayStation 3 on Wednesday represents it arriving late to the current-generation game and with little new to offer.