New York Times

A public spat flared up this week between Tesla Motors co-founder Elon Musk and the New York Times reporter John Broder over a test drive of the new Tesla Model S. The review, which Musk called “fake” on Twitter, triggered a war of both words and data, with Musk releasing Broder’s driving logs. Though Broder countered with a detailed follow up, the drama was an object lesson in how the dynamics of disputes like this have been transformed by big data. Read more

Tech news from around the web:

  • Bulging corporate balance sheets – and a growing reluctance among traditional venture investors such as state pension funds to dabble in risky investments -  means that big companies are getting back into venture financing, SilliconValley reports, with nearly 9 per cent of all capital being committed to start-ups last year coming from the corporate sector.

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Digital music services like MOG, Rdio and Rhapsody have been vocal about their fear that Apple’s subscription policy will ruin innovative companies already shouldering start-up losses, and the industry’s concern was again on display at the FT Digital Media and Broadcasting conference on Wednesday. Read more

Tech news from around the web:

  • Mark Zuckerberg’s fan page on Facebook appears to have been hacked, TechCrunch reports. A strange message appeared on the page on Tuesday and generated more than 1,800 likes and nearly 500 comments before Facebook took it down:

Let the hacking begin: If facebook needs money, instead of going to the banks, why doesn’t Facebook let its users invest in Facebook in a social way? Why not transform Facebook into a ‘social business’ the way Nobel Price winner Muhammad Yunus described it? http://bit.ly/fs6rT3 What do you think? #hackercup2011

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  • Google is one of those companies that we generally refer to as a frenemy,” New York Times executive editor Bill Keller said recently. Perhaps, but today Google proved it will be no saviour to the newspaper business, either. Google chief executive Eric Schmidt told the Financial Times that the company had previously considered buying a newspaper or using its charitable arm to support news businesses seeking non-profit status, but is now unlikely to pursue either option.
  • Craigslist is on the offensive. The US-based classified-advertising website has taken legal action against the attorney-general of South Carolina, who had attacked the site over its erotic services category. The company, which came under pressure from law enforcement officials to take down the section, then did so, is seeking declaratory relief and a restraining order against Henry McMaster, who has repeatedly threatened the company and its executives with criminal charges unless it complied with the requests.

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