News Corp.

Tim Bradshaw

The legacy of Steve Jobs will ensure strong results for Apple for up to two more years, according to Prince Alwaleed bin Talal, the Saudi billionaire and major investor in the Cupertino firm.

Prince Alwaleed, whose foundation has also invested in Twitter and News Corp, appeared on the high-class chat show Charlie Rose hosts for PBS and Bloomberg on Tuesday night, where he discussed issues ranging from the Syrian crisis and Iran’s nuclear programme to Citigroup (Vikram Pandit has been “an excellent CEO”, he said).

For other technology and media investors, though, his supportive comments for Rupert and James Murdoch, Twitter’s business model and Apple’s outlook are of most interest. Read more

Tim Bradshaw

Tech news from around the web, Super Bowl edition:

Although automotive companies were the most prolific advertisers during Sunday’s Super Bowl, many of the $7m-a-minute spots also involved tech companies – large and small. Read more

Tech news from around the web:

News Corp’s  iPad-only publication, the Daily, is averaging about 120,000 readers a week - less than a quarter than the 500,000 users the company said it needed to make money – Bloomberg reports. After the free trial, subscribers pay 99 cents per week or $39.99 a year to read the publication. Read more

Tech news from around the web:

  • Microsoft says it is still considering whether to offer Office on Apple’s App store for its Mac computers, says AllThingsDigital.
  • Mashable reports that the Motion Picture Association of America, working with Dutch anti-piracy group BREIN, has cracked down on the file-sharing of pirated films and TV programmes by shutting down 12 “torrent” websites in the US and at least 39 sites abroad by filing copyright violation complaints with the sites’ hosting providers. 

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If you drop by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art on Wednesday January 19, you will find some great Henri Cartier-Bresson pictures and an interesting exhibition on “Voyeurism, surveillance and the camera since 1870”, but you won’t find Steve Jobs and Rupert Murdoch.  Read more

Tech news from around the web:

  • The launch of the Daily, News Corp’s news service for the iPad has been put back by a few weeks, All Things Digital reports. Apple supposedly needs extra time to tweak its new subscription service for publications sold through iTunes.
  • BGR has the details of the two latest BlackBerry smartphone handsets: the Dakota, which it claims will “sit right at the head of the BlackBerry family dinner table”, and an upgrade to its Torch model.

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With any Virgin launch, it is worth looking for the substance behind the hype guaranteed by Sir Richard Branson’s involvement. Tuesday’s unveiling of Project, billed as the first truly interactive magazine for the iPad age, was no exception.

Joined by Holly, his 29-year-old daughter who is leading the Project, er, project, the bearded balloonist happily played into the hands of reporters who have billed his pitch for Apple’s tablet as a battle of the billionaires with Rupert Murdoch, whose $30m iPad “newspaper”, The Daily, is expected early next year.

“This is not a battle. This is not a war. It’s about the future of publishing,” he said, before adding the jibe that 30 years of reading Mr Murdoch’s papers convinced him that his title would win “the battle of quality”. Read more

Tim Bradshaw

The time is near for putting to the test Rupert Murdoch’s rhetoric about the value of digital journalism and the evils of Google.

The Times and the Sunday Times will unveil their new (separate) websites to the public “imminently” – perhaps as soon as Tuesday. Within four weeks, the paywall barriers will be raised. All but the homepage will be invisible to those refusing to pay £1 a day – and that includes Google’s spiders. Read more

Richard Waters

Rupert Murdoch is enough of a newsman to know this: if you start a public row, you might as well cash in on it in your own publications.

Today’s Wall Street Journal gives Eric Schmidt the space to defend himself against some of the accusations that Murdoch and his underlings have been hurling at Google recently. Read more

David Gelles

Over the weekend we revealed that News Corp and Microsoft were in talks to “de-index” News Corp’s content from Google, in favour of Microsoft’s Bing search engine.

By today it was clear that this is part of a broader move by Microsoft to boost Bing by getting publishers to cut their sites off from Google. Read more