samsung

Tim Bradshaw

Samsung has been at the International Consumer Electronics Show in force this week, but despite its massive booth, 64th-floor parties and flashy press conference, perhaps its most interesting event happened on the sidelines.

Two dozen reporters crammed in to a small meeting room on Tuesday afternoon to quiz a panel of Samsung’s top designers from Seoul.

Their appearance at CES follows Samsung’s $1bn defeat in patent litigation against Apple last summer, where a jury found nearly all of the accused Samsung smartphones to have infringed Apple’s iPhone designs.

This was never addressed directly; instead, the event was focused on Samsung’s new “design identity 3.0”, which aims to “make it meaningful” – and on driving home the Korean giant’s designer credentials. Read more

Surging mobile sales drove earnings at Samsung Electronics to another record, despite competition from Apple’s iPhone 5. The FT’s Simon Mundy reports from Seoul on how Samsung beat analysts’ forecasts and how the company is positioned.

Tim Bradshaw

Samsung’s big CES launch brought a new tablet-inspired user interface to its smart TVs, upgradable telly brains, a new 4G tablet, improvements to its connected camera line, HD laptops and a really big fridge.

After queues around the Mandalay Bay conference centre beforehand that matched Apple for hype and desperation, Samsung wants us to “discover the world of possibilities” and came with a generous helping of what it keeps calling “the wow”.

Here’s the blow-by-blow, as it happened: Read more

There are few better views in Las Vegas than the neon-sparkling Strip by night from the panoramic windows of a 64th floor restaurant, but Toshiba diverted eyes on Sunday to an equally engrossing sight, with its unveiling of an 84-inch “Ultra HD” TV atop the Mandalay Bay Hotel.

Dancing models, luscious foliage, scenes of natural beauty dazzled like a Vegas show on the huge screen. The clarity of the picture was amazing; the colours were rich and vibrant. But the price was unmentionable.

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Back of Google Nexus 10

Google’s latest addition to its hardware range, the Nexus 10, has landed. This time Google partnered with Samsung to produce an iPad-beating spec sheet and what they tout as the ‘highest resolution display in the world’. Priced at £319 in the UK and $399 in the US, could the Nexus 10 tempt Android holdouts? Read more

Apple’s battle with Samsung in the UK courts has taken yet another new twist, after the US group was reprimanded by a judge for posting a statement on its website that was too cheeky, writes Robert Cookson.

Last month, the Court of Appeal ruled that Samsung had not infringed on the design of the iPad and ordered Apple to post a statement on its UK website to ensure that the public were aware of the judgement. Read more

Apple has grudgingly complied with a UK court’s request to publicise the fact that it lost a case against Samsung. But rather than show any contrition, the US tech group took the opportunity to take a dig at its South Korean rival, writes Robert CooksonRead more

Chris Nuttall

While Google has managed to resolve a lot of the bugs and frustrations of its Chromebook, the main issue of having to pay a relatively high price for a fairly limited laptop has remained.

Until now. The launch this week of a $249 (£229) Chromebook makes Google’s vision of computing in the cloud affordable and appealing, with a thin and light machine from Samsung that is $200 cheaper than its previous model released in May. Read more

Apple’s $1bn win over Samsung in California should give inventors cautious optimism, writes James Dyson, founder and chief engineer of Dyson. It was an overwhelming victory in spite of a vacillating process that puts the onus on the patent’s owner to prove it has been copied, rather than the infringer to prove it has not.

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Interesting commentary from around the Web on the tech story that made headlines this week.

Apple’s patent win against Samsung in the US courts last week prompted a wave of reactions from across the tech sphere. While some found that Apple’s victory would slow down technology development, others argued it could be the driving force behind a push to innovate more in the smartphone industry. Read more

Chris Nuttall

HP, Lenovo, Samsung, Sony and Toshiba have been showing the shape of Windows 8 computing to come, unveiling hybrid PC/tablet devices that take advantage of the new dual-mode operating system when it launches on October 26.

HP has been demonstrating its Envy x2 (pictured left) to media in San Francisco, while its Asian rivals launched their takes on hybrid computing at the IFA consumer electronics show in Berlin.  None of them have anything to fear from Apple in this area, in terms of patent disputes or rival devices, with Tim Cook, chief executive, describing such designs as being as unsatisfactory as combining a toaster with a refrigerator. Read more

This month Apple has achieved something almost as remarkable as transforming a phone into an iPhone. It has turned Samsung into an underdog.

That takes some doing. Samsung, with its 220,000 employees and 83 business divisions, astonishingly accounts for a fifth of South Korean exports and has such an overwhelming presence in its home market it is described by one detractor as an “aggressive octopus”. To regard it as the plucky – albeit “copycat” – upstart is the equivalent of getting people to root for Goliath on the grounds that “a big man like that just doesn’t stand a chance”.

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Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1

Samsung’s Galaxy Note 10.1 tablet went on sale on Thursday, with an emphasis on challenging the iPad by focusing on creative possibilities that are enhanced by its pen. Sony’s updated Reader, also just launched, has the simpler aim of immersing you in a digital book and it feels lighter than most paperbacks.

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Maija Palmer

The love affair with the mobile phone appears to have faltered a little, with worldwide mobile phone sales down for the second quarter in a row, according to new figures from Gartner. But is this just a small hiatus as consumers wait for the next round of handsets from Apple and Samsung to hit the shelves later this year, or a sign of something deeper?

Gartner is clearly a little worried, as it is paring back its earlier estimates for 2012 handset sales by between 25m and 40m units. Its not a huge drop, only about 2 per cent of the estimated 1.9bn unit sales this year, but Anshul Gupta, analyst at Gartner says he has been a little surprised by the fall.  Read more

In the second week of Apple v Samsung at a court in San Jose, their patent dispute took a more serious turn, after the titillating revelations of the first week included Apple designs for a 7in iPad, one with a kickstand and Samsung considering a Retina display-like tablet, writes Constance Nuttall.

Testimony from expert witnesses this week shifted the focus towards the patented materials. Those called by Apple claiming that aspects of certain Samsung smartphones and tablets were easily confused with Apple products, namely the iPhone and iPad. Read more

Tim Bradshaw

The first day of the high-profile court case in California between Samsung and Apple over smartphone patents began and ended with an irate judge berating the Korean tech giant.

Samsung’s lawyers started proceedings, before the jury entered the courtroom, by – in their own words – begging Judge Koh to allow them to submit evidence which they argued provided “indisputable evidence” that it came up with its black-rectangle touchscreen smartphone designs before 2007’s release of the iPhone.

“In 36 years, I’ve never begged the court. I’m begging the court now,” said John Quinn of Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan, an LA law firm. “What’s the point in having a trial?” Read more

Tim Bradshaw

It is a hazard of holding a patent trial in the San Francisco Bay Area that many potential jurors have links to Silicon Valley companies. It took the full first day in a San Jose court to select a fair and balanced jury for the patent case between Apple and Samsung, dashing hopes that the court might have heard the two companies’ opening arguments on Monday afternoon. Read more

Sony Xperia Ion

Android smartphones have the summer to themselves in the absence of any new iPhone launch – so Sony and Samsung are taking on America this week with the Ion and Galaxy S III respectively. Also a look at a cellular Wi-Fi hotspot device from Tep that prevents rip-off roaming charges when using your smartphones abroad.

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The next move in the race for dominance of the lucrative smartphone market has been made by Samsung, after the Korean electronics group unveiled the latest incarnation of its best-selling Galaxy range in London.

The Galaxy SIII comes with a host of innovations and gimmicks – such as multitasking functions and a high definition screen – that Samsung will hope will be enough to take further customers away from the dominant iPhone range made by Apple. Read more

Chris Nuttall

Samsung and Apple may be locked in a smartphone and tablet war and concomitant patent disputes, but the Korean manufacturer may be responsible for more than half the cost in component terms of the new iPad, which went on sale on Friday.

A “teardown” by the IHS iSuppli research firm reveals Samsung is supplying the new Retina high-definition display, its applications processor, the Nand Flash memory in some cases and probably the battery as well. Read more