Scribd

Chris Nuttall

Some of the best e-Reading experiences and innovations are happening on the web right now.

Ray Kurzweil’s Blio eReader is finally available and Scribd announced today it is enriching its entire library with Apture Highlights – a feature already enabled on this very blog post. Read more

Chris Nuttall

A new breed of publishing services on the web are rapidly expanding their offerings to fresh markets and devices.

Docstoc, which allows the sharing of professional documents, opened its DocStore to individuals  on Tuesday, while Scribd, its larger rival, announced on Wednesday easier ways of making its documents accessible on eReaders  and other mobile devices. Read more

  • Look out Amazon. Scribd, a digital document sharing service, is launching an online retail market for books and documents, betting that a surge in interest in reading online will help it transform into an Ebay or an Amazon.com of text. The two-year-old Silicon Valley start-up, whose doubling of audience size every six months has been compared to YouTube’s explosive growth, will let some 60m readers of its service begin charging each other for the rights to access just about anything uploaded to the service.
  • Facebook became a relying party for OpenID, the universal web login standard that is trying to gain traction. That means, for example, that Facebook users with an associated Gmail account will be able to browse Facebook without having to login if they are coming from Gmail. But Google, an issuing party, is not likely to become a relying party anytime soon. Doing so would mean surrendering some control of access to their proprietary accounts.

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  • IBM is said to be in talks to acquire rival Sun Microsystems for about $6.5bn, potentially marking a major consolidation in the computer hardware manufacturing industry. The move would boost IBM’s hardware offerings, but the deal could face major regulatory hurdles.
  • Oracle reported lower sales and profit for the quarter, but the results beat analyst estimates, sending shares higher. Some watchers were predicting a much worse decline. Oracle announced it would pay its first dividend – 5 cents a share – since the company went public in 1986.

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