tesla motors

A public spat flared up this week between Tesla Motors co-founder Elon Musk and the New York Times reporter John Broder over a test drive of the new Tesla Model S. The review, which Musk called “fake” on Twitter, triggered a war of both words and data, with Musk releasing Broder’s driving logs. Though Broder countered with a detailed follow up, the drama was an object lesson in how the dynamics of disputes like this have been transformed by big data. 

  • Speculation about Facebook‘s finances has once again been swirling, but chief executive Mark Zuckerberg at least provided a bit of clarity. Over the weekend VentureBeat said Facebook was about to close a $150m round to buy out shares from hundreds of employees. Then TechCrunch chimed in with a report that the company turned down a $200m term sheet that valued the company at $8bn because the investors wanted a board seat. Facebook is notoriously tight-lipped, but today Mr Zuckerberg said that his company is in no immediate need of capital, and that he does hope to take Facebook public, but not for a couple of years.
  • Could the worst be over? Hewlett-Packard said that stronger than expected Chinese and US consumer markets helped it beat Wall Street profit projections for the second quarter, and the world’s leading personal computer company by revenue struck a note of cautious optimism on the economy as a whole.