TiVo

Richard Waters

The patent wars raging in the smartphone business are not the only example of how IP rights are being brought to bear in the fight for control of an important new consumer technology market. Microsoft has just extended its case against TiVo, asking a US court to block imports of set-top boxes it claims infringe four of its patents. 

Paul Taylor

With Google TV coming to screens near you in the autumn, internet-enabled television is set to attract a lot  of eyeballs.

For those that cannot wait for the Google/Sony/Logitech/Intel product, there are already plenty of set-top box options for streaming movies and adding internet content channels to your TV. We explore some of these in the Personal Technology column in Friday’s Business Life section of the FT. 

Chris Nuttall

My TiVo digital video recorder has been gathering dust for the past couple of years since I replaced it with free DVRs from Dish Network that did more or less the same thing and had bigger capacities.

But TiVo is giving current and former users a reason to consider buying its boxes anew with the launch of its Premiere and Premiere XL units on Wednesday. 

Chris Nuttall

Despite being invited, there was no one from the cable industry represented on the TV of Tomorrow Show’s Over The Top panel this week – probably because they were outside guarding their lunch, which the panelists seemed bent on eating.

Over The Top refers to a new range of internet-based entertainment and information services being fed into televisions that vault over the top of services being provided by the established cable and satellite players in the US. 

Chris Nuttall

Amazon has found itself another route to the television and Roku another use for its set-top box under a partnership announced today.

The internet retailer has been exploring ways to widen access to its Video on Demand service beyond the computer and has already made it available through Tivo digital video recorders and Sony Bravia TVs. 

  • After more than 40 years, a first from Intel: the leading semiconductor company announced that it would outsource the manufacturing of some of its chips. The unprecedented agreement with Taiwan’s TSMC shows how Intel is adjusting its manufacturing and business model as the Atom processor starts to play a bigger part in its future. While the US company will still make the low-cost chips for netbook computers itself, it said that TSMC’s relationships with device makers would help the technology find its way into a much wider range of smartphones and other gadgets.