touch screen

Chris Nuttall

The traditional desktop PC may eventually be ousted by the tablet, but in Hewlett-Packard’s new TouchSmart 610 PC, we can already see its recline and fall as the design heads towards the horizontal. This week’s Personal Technology column in the FT’s Business Life section reviews the 610, whose tilting screen could prove a tipping point for future versions of all-in-one touchscreen PCs. 

For a sign of how quickly touchscreens are gaining in popularity on devices ranging from smartphones and tablets to all-in-one PCs, one need look no further than the recent fortunes of Taiwan’s Wintek, one of the world’s biggest suppliers of touchscreen modules. 

The US International Trade Commission on Monday decided to investigate patent infringement claims made by Taiwan’s Elan Microelectronics against Apple.

The ITC “has voted to institute an investigation of certain electronic devices with multi-touch enabled touchpads and touchscreens. The products at issue in this investigation are electronic devices such as mobile telephones and computers that have multi-touch user interfaces,” it said on its website

Robin Harding

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=amVqnCw55n4[/youtube]

This week’s CEATEC show in Tokyo showed that, while the Japanese mobile handset market may be in a slump, it is still the world’s most innovative.