Robin Kwong

Some experts think wearable technology – from sleep monitors to fitness bands – could be the next frontier in how companies monitor their workers, further blurring the lines between our work and private lives.

Over the next four days Sarah O’Connor, the Financial Times’ Employment Correspondent will be fitted out in wearable gadgets while she works, to see if the personal data they generate really would be useful to managers – and whether workers could learn to live with it.

Follow her regular updates via the Wearables at Work Facebook page, where you’ll find her updates, videos, and thoughts on the project. She’ll be tweeting about the project using the #wearables hashtag, and each day, we’ll storify a selection of the Facebook posts and bring it here to the Techblog.

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Maija Palmer

As UK companies scramble to comply with new laws requiring them to disclose and get permission for all the cookies they use, a new study has found that more than two thirds of all the bits of tracker code on websites are from third parties. Which means they are essentially for delivering targeted advertising or analysing behaviour across the website.

It helps explain why compliance with the new cookie laws has been so slow and difficult for many companies. It is very likely they don’t want to broadcast to the world just how many different organisations are grabbing data about their customers.  Read more