twitter

Twitter has announced the acquisition of Gnip – one of only two companies it originally gave access to the “firehose” of trillions of tweets – as the social media company pursues revenues through selling analytical services. Read more

Hannah Kuchler

Twitter unveiled the first sign of its much awaited new design on Tuesday, to a near-universal reaction that it looked just like Facebook. Read more

Tim Bradshaw

Expectations were running high ahead of Twitter’s maiden earnings as a public company – its stock had risen by almost 50 per cent since November’s IPO.
But investors got the jitters when they saw slowing growth in user numbers and engagement rates in the fourth quarter of 2013, feeding their fears that Twitter might be a niche product which the mass market will never understand. Dick Costolo, chief executive, stressed this was a problem they had always known about and had a plan to fix. Nonetheless, shareholders were not comforted, sending Twitter shares down almost 18 per cent in after-hours trading.
In this liveblog, Hannah Kuchler and Tim Bradshaw covered reaction and live commentary from the conference call.  

US politicians are swinging from Vines at President Obama for the first time in their reaction to last night’s State of the Union speech. Read more

Hannah Kuchler

The company also announced last week that it will help advertisers to target people who have already visited their website and tempt them back through promoted tweets. This so-called “retargeting” is common across the web and Twitter said trials had seen “impressive results”.

Advertisers recorded substantial increases in engagement and conversion rates, and a fall in the cost of acquiring a customer. But Twitter, which has been praised by campaigners for its privacy policies, said users can chose not to see tailored ads. Read more

Richard Waters

There was plenty of self-congratulation going on between Twitter and its advisers on Thursday. They had just avoided a repeat of the messy Facebook IPO: Twitter is officially the new darling of Wall Street.

But did they err in the other direction instead and massively under-price the offering? Read more

Twitter began life as a public company today as it started trading on the New York Stock Exchange in the most closely watched initial public offering of the year.

The San Francisco-based company priced its shares on Wednesday at $26 a piece. It will raise about $2.1bn by selling 80.5m shares, or about 13 per cent of the company.

The shares closed up 73 per cent at $44.90.

 

If there were any remaining doubts that Twitter wanted to contrast its initial public offering with that of Facebook’s, consider the way the messaging platform is running its investor roadshow.

Last May, Mark Zuckerberg donned his trademark “hoodie” and strode through the main entrance of the Sheraton Hotel, where the lobby was flooded with network reporters, cameraman and journalists. The media flurry surrounded not just the Facebook founder but also would-be investors.

But here on the 36th floor of the Midtown Manhattan Mandarin Oriental hotel in the lush Time Warner Center just off Central Park West, I am the only reporter in sight, writes Arash MassoudiRead more

Hannah Kuchler

Twitter released an updated version of its initial public offering filing on Tuesday afternoon in the US, announcing it will list on the NYSE and giving details about its last three months as a private company.

Here are five things you need to know from the messaging platform’s release:

1. Losses are mounting. Net losses widened significantly from June to September, rising from $70m in the first six months, to $134m for the first nine months as the cost of revenue increased. Read more

Hannah Kuchler

Twitter took advantage of the new Jobs Act to file the drafts of its initial public offering document in secret, denying journalists and investors the chance to watch its rough and tumble with the SEC.

But when the registration document was published on Thursday, the SEC also revealed the draft filings Twitter had made since it filed in private way back in July. There’s no big secret hiding here but a few interesting changes that give an indication of what Twitter may have been talking to the SEC about – although of course, they could have just decided to change it themselves. Read more